What Does Demographic Crunch Look Like? – Questions For Corbett #054

02/06/202059 Comments

This week James tackles a question from Corbett Report member HomeRemedySupply who asks about the declining population in Japan. What does a shrinking population look like, and how does it impact the economy and the culture? Find out more in this week’s edition of Questions For Corbett.

Watch this video on BitChute / Minds.com / YouTube or Download the mp4

SHOW NOTES:
HomeRemedySupply’s question

Over 13% of the homes in Japan are abandoned

China’s Doom: Birthrate Lowest Since Founded In 1949

Episode 339 – Meet Paul Ehrlich, Pseudoscience Charlatan

This Is What A Demographic Crunch Looks Like

Millions of Japanese homes are abandoned, and owners are giving them away for free

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  1. Jed says:

    Ken Follett wrote a series of historical novels and in one of them that follows “World Without End,” the demographic crunch after the Black Death in Europe has the foraging survivors wearing expensive clothes and jewelry. No one will serve another so the surviving lords and ladies are shit-outa-luck. Today there’s technology to replace servants.
    The used condoms who built the Georgia Guide Stones promise a future human population of under 500 million and maybe they’re not kidding.

    • Libertydan says:

      “Used Condoms”, that sounds pretty low, eh!

    • wylie1 says:

      They seem quite serious. Especially upon viewing, the acres upon acres of stacked inside each other plastic coffins suitable for about 4 or 5 bodies each, which have been waiting for some years at locations around the country.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3zSDdm-SHI

    • troys says:

      If there really is a push on to reduce the human population, then wouldn’t governments give incentives to not have children, or at the very least not give incentives for couples to have children? The Japanese government has been giving incentives to couples to have kids for some decades now.

      I teach English online to a lot of Japanese students, and they’ve told me that the government has been offering financial and other incentives, and they’ve told me that these’ve led to increased birth rates. One obstacle that remains is the lack of childcare services.

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        Interesting.
        It is somewhat of an odd paradox. Lack of labor for childcare services.
        “We need more kids so we can have childcare services for future generations.”

  2. n4x5 says:

    I’m relatively unconcerned about maintaining the Earth’s absolute human population numbers per se, but this represents only one aspect of this topic. The demographic implications (as James mentions) are profound, opening the door for social engineering in the forms of immigration, technocracy, and so forth. As we explore these trends, it’s important to keep in mind that what we are witnessing is not without its engineered causes as well as “solutions”: the techniques employed to lower population numbers — feminism, abortion, “LGBTQ” gender and sexual identities — also come with serious societal disruptions, birth rates aside.

    On the issue of immigration specifically, there is also the delicate matter of race and ethnicity. As the less fecund native “legacy” populations of e.g. Europe and Japan fail to sustain a birth rate above replacement, the immigration issue arises. As averse as I am to the idea of restricting people’s freedom of movement, I also recognize the truth that culturally incompatible newcomers often create serious problems in their new homelands. As dangerous as it may be to discuss in the current prevailing “respectable” intellectual and political climate, the study of racial and ethnic features are germane to an analysis of this phenomenon. To what degree is the prosperity and order of places like Europe and Japan the result of the genetic character of its peoples? To what degree is the poverty of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, the result of the genetic character of its inhabitants? In the case of the United States, we see an enormous discrepancy in the rates of violence between blacks and whites, for instance. How much of this is expected / predictable, given genetic differences? How much is due to the legacy of systematic discrimination against blacks and their lack of economic opportunity? How much is due to the cultural decline resulting from the programs of the Great Society and the crack epidemic? Disentangling these variables is of course difficult, but it isn’t unreasonable to believe that both nature and nurture play a role. (Accounting for epigenetics, the interaction of nature and nurture, introduces further complications.) If we’re truly concerned with the very real consequences involved, it’s imperative that we answer these questions honestly, unintimidated by political correctness pressures. I speak as a white male who has spent much of his life near and among other races / ethnicities and who has had many friends and acquaintances of other racial backgrounds (mostly black). Being realists on this type of sensitive subject matter is important, regardless of our biases (for or against) people different than ourselves.

    • n4x5 says:

      In any case, culture certainly matters, regardless of the degree to which cultural differences can ultimately be traced back to inherent genetic differences versus environmental circumstances. Refer back to James Evan Pilato’s visit to Japan, where the order of Japanese society was pointed out as remarkable: There is relatively little chance that a lost possession on the street will be stolen; most likely it would be left untouched or delivered to a nearby police station. I’ll go way out on a limb and say that the large-scale importation of foreigners from low-trust societies into high-trust Japanese society would quickly destroy any hope of such cultural norms remaining ubiquitous in Japan for long. One might make similar predictions about the fate of other prosperous, well-ordered societies. It’s interesting to observe the prevailing attitude of the Japanese towards the prospect of immigration, as opposed to e.g. those in Europe. Apparently, the Japanese didn’t get the memo that any support of native identity is tantamount to “supremacism” and is to be maligned mercilessly. I’ll be interested to hear more from James on this in the future.

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        n4x5 says:
        ” I’ll be interested to hear more from James on this in the future.”

        Me too.

        MANNERS (or respect)
        My impression, although I have never been there, is that the Japanese culture tends to have a strong emphasis on manners or giving respect to others.

        Something that has been grinding my teeth over the past few years is the deterioration of good manners or empathy/respect for others in the United States.
        People, even professionals, are not behaving like they did 20 or 30 years ago, much less 50 years ago.
        Some of the behavior is gross. And many times it can come from upper middle class “privileged” professionals.
        At times, I am aghast and furious.
        Sometimes, I will scold adults like a curmudgeon school teacher, for simple kindergarten things like rudely cutting line.
        One brief example: Doing a favor for the landlord who is selling his property, last Sunday there were scheduled 5 realtors with clients to see my rental place at different times throughout the stretch of the day. 3 of the 5 cancelled less than 20 minutes prior (or even after) their appointment time. This cost me money, because I took off work.

        • n4x5 says:

          What’s surprising to me about your story is that three of the five actually made the effort to cancel, as opposed to simply not showing up without notice or explanation. It seems to me that ghosting is becoming the norm.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghosting_(relationships)

          • HomeRemedySupply says:

            Geez! What a deliberately cruel thing to do.
            But, I guess in the end, the victim is lucky to have parted ways. Who wants to be around that type of behavior/mindset?!

            • Bilejones says:

              Not necessarily. It’s likely that the realtor had a series of apartments for his client to see on the same day. The search ends when they see one they want and they cancel the later appointments. It would waste more of everybody’s time if politeness forced them to go through the charade of keeping them.
              People in the business know this,

      • Medhead says:

        Yes this would certainly be a good question for Corbett. I think I may predict how James would respond though. He would say that the use of government force has created all this mess in the first place. From the wars in the middle East creating a wave of refugees to governments in the west complicit in actively bringing in these migrants and also making it illegal to local citizens to oppose such a transformation with boycotts (which would be deemed discriminatory). The problem is that it’s happening and if we want to reverse the problem, would state force in the form of right wing governments be necessary?

        • n4x5 says:

          It’s a fair question. It should also be pointed out here that many of Europe’s “right wing” politicians are allegedly Zionist controlled opposition not unlike Trump et al in the US.

          Beyond the valid grievances regarding quantifiables like the increased crime rate and tax burden, I can’t dismiss the simple desire to preserve the identity of a place as distinctly Irish or French or Hungarian or Japanese either. Even insofar as the migrants prove to be peaceful and productive, there is something arguably worth protecting that isn’t captured in crime statistics or GDP.

          I’ll also add a strong recommendation for The Slaughter of Cities: Urban Renewal As Ethnic Cleansing by E. Michael Jones as a well-documented case study of the use of weaponized migration. (Unfortunately, no digital version is available online as far as I know; a hard copy will have to be found.) Much like the current situation in Europe, here we see demographic trends and war as catalysts of social engineering. The book describes a multi-decade campaign of black migration used against the urban, mostly Catholic, white ethnic neighborhoods of various northern cities of the United States, orchestrated by the usual suspects at the national level (Rockefellers, Ford Foundation, among others) in cooperation with municipal government and business interests, justified by wartime labor demand and later under the guise of the civil rights movement.

  3. manbearpig says:

    Great question. Great answer.

    What d’ya think HRS?

  4. owen22 says:

    If there isn’t already, there should be a word for describing topics (e.g. demographic crunch) that are overly hypothetical, or as Corbett put it, “in the ether”. Once you recognize this type of topic for what it is, you can spare yourself from falling into a rabbit hole of hypotheticals that only lead to further confusion. Recognition is key, and initial recognition is preferable. Unfortunately, these “ether-topics” (a purely practical term – I’m no poet) exist in the first place precisely because of their own overwhelming nature, which makes them hard to approach from a practical standpoint. When presented with a large-scale phenomenon such as demographic crunch it’s simpler to discuss it from a philosophical angle than confront it head on. We’ve all fallen victim to this unproductive way of thinking, and we’ve all facepalmed upon realizing the self-harm caused by falling down that rabbit whole. Make a conscious effort to recognize ether-topics!

  5. Libertydan says:

    I think that the population thing has a way of working itself out. When times are good people tend to have more kids. Note the “Baby Boom” after the second world war. When things are bad, people tend not to have kids because it is deemed too expensive.
    On the other hand, the rich greedy bastards can afford to have all the kids they want, while the poor are deceived into becoming sterile.
    What could go wrong with a world filled with the off-spring of rich greedy bastards, eh!

  6. wylie1 says:

    Do/will the Japanese really hate less people crowding onto their trains? Apparently so, if importing workers.

  7. troys says:

    The elderly care industry is experiencing a lack of workers. Lots of Filipino women are doing the work, largely because they are good at it, and even like it. Japanese don’t want to do the work. I teach English online to students in Japan. One of my students is Korean, placing Filipino caregiver women in these facilities, and she tells me stories all the time. This is one industry that can only increase in size, and the country doesn’t have nearly enough Japanese to do the work.

    • HomeRemedySupply says:

      I noticed a lot of Filipino caregiver women in San Diego.
      They did a good job with my stroke victim / Alzheimer’s Mother who would have been 90 yesterday, but finally got to leave the body last summer.

  8. Mintaka says:

    Sure, the Japanese population is shrinking.
    But I think what is also missing in James’ answer is that part of the “emptying out of the countryside” is due to the mass migration into mega-cities. The young population who are driven there by the bright lights and the imbued desire for a university “education”. This leaves the little towns without the next generation to take over the family farms and other businesses. This in turn causes the dying-out of traditional arts & skills such as tatami making, traditional food production, etc.

    Been to Japan many, many times. The island of Hokkaido, Asahikawa city in particular.
    There, it is abundantly clear what is happening, obvious for all to see.
    Indeed, houses standing empty. Each time we go back there another house has gone or sits empty. What has the house been replaced with? Yep, yet another parking lot. A traditional soba shop where we ate many times. Not just is the shop gone, the whole building is gone. Carpark you say? Yep.
    Traditional family shops closed down, replaced by international chain stores in a large shopping mall, Aeon usually.

    The thing is of course that this pattern is replicated around the globe.
    It’s an agenda.
    The mega-city is our future (in our controllers’ eyes) where we will be totally dependent on The System.

  9. Mintaka says:

    There is one little town (can’t remember the name) where dolls are almost the exclusive residents.
    One of the few remaining people left there is making these dolls and placing them in abandoned houses and other buildings and structures (like a bus stop).
    Quite eerie.
    The lady that makes them also says that it is the young people that are moving to the cities and not coming back. The elderly pass on, and the house ends up sitting empty.

    Another reason for many empty houses is that during the good times 1960-1980’s many Japanese people bought second or third houses. Now they’ve fallen on much harder times and can no longer afford those houses and end up abandoning them.
    Selling them is futile since they’re worth next-to-nothing, they paid BIG money when they had them built.
    Demolishing a house is expensive and in some cases, the council rate actually goes UP without the house there.

    My, my, how things can change in the space of a generation, or two.

    • Mintaka says:

      Something just occurred to me regarding those dolls.
      In the near future, replace them with robots. Robots that will have the legal right to purchase real estate and other assets and of course, 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐛𝐭.
      The sky will be the limit as far as blowing up that debt bubble is concerned and at the same solve declining populations and abandoned houses.
      Occupied by robot mum&dad with their robot children, robot dog&cat and the robot bees (courtesy of DARPA) flying around.
      Then papa robot gets called up for 𝐈𝐓𝐒 tour of duty, which of course 𝐈𝐓 will accept without question (if 𝐈𝐓 didn’t it would mean instant termination).
      Tour of duty can range from cleaning up the toilets at the local army barracks or participating as a proxy terrorist in a False Flag attack on the target country of the day. If 𝐈𝐓 makes it out, it’s back to 𝐈𝐓𝐒 robot family, if 𝐈𝐓 doesn’t, then mama robot gets a new mate, 𝐈𝐓 wouldn’t know the difference.

      Only rambling on about this because of the incessant coverage of robot technology in Japanese media. A robot being blessed by a priest while standing in prayer pose.
      I mean, 𝐖𝐓𝐅?

  10. alexandre says:

    QFC – James, did you see the last State of the Union Address?
    I watched the whole thing like I was watching Jaws or something. Like a movie. I actually thought about writing a score for it as if it was a film (I kept hearing “Night on Bald Mountain” every time it cut to Melania), but I guess it would be “an exercise in futility”, as the NASA guy said. I was astonished and flabbergasted. A TV reality show of the worst imaginable kind, unbelievable stuff, and for someone not trained anymore on TV, it was profoundly disturbing that THAT is a thing that actually happens and is taken seriously. Afterwards I watched the comments and “monologues” – Stephen Colbert, Trevor Noah (Daily Show), Seth Meyers (Closer Look) and even Bill Maher (Real Time). It was a TV marathon (I don’t watch TV at all since the past 10 years almost) and I thought I was in wonderland. The distance between what I see here (or TSM, P.Wood etc) and that was mind blowing. I don’t know what importance that ritual has in reality and I wonder what you think. One interesting thing was the appearance of Steve Bannon on Bill Maher. I’m sure I know that name from your work and, even not sure of where I heard it, it was like watching Maher introducing his pal Nosferatu or something. I jumped on the sofa.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUOY8wY60W4
    It’s like watching reality from another dimension’s perspective, really disturbing.

    That’s it. Thank you.

    • manbearpig says:

      “…THAT is a thing that actually happens and is taken seriously…”

      You’re living what I lived in 1994…

      I’m really sorry! I don’t know what to do…

      • alexandre says:

        I was thinking that, given the stream of synchronicity I’ve been having with Corbett, maybe he was gonna talk about that on the next video, so I asked him here just in case. But probably no one thinks this is of any interest.

        Once, a long time ago, I kept watching for 3 hours the supreme court TV channel here and my mom asked me if I was all right. Depending on which eyes you watch it with (is that correct? with which eye you look…?), erm…you see so much it’s scary. Most people probably regard that as irrelevant and common, but man that is some ritual. It can be extremely funny too. Since I was so out of shape – TV wise – maybe it was just that. Nothing new about this one, except the “surprise” homecoming of the soldier there with the family, which is so incredibly Silvio Santos (a TV guy here that had a program called “Doors of Hope” that did exactly that) I just couldn’t believe it. That woman yelling “Madam speaker! So and so…” and applause. It’s just…interesting. Bizarre. To me it says a lot, specially about the niveau mental of that whole gang.

        The Steve Bannon chat with Bill Maher I think is worth a look. Or maybe not.

        • manbearpig says:

          “I wish we had someone as evil as you on our side?”

          ??

          I freaked out a student Friday evening simply by saying I didn’t think humans were responsible for climate change.

          This’ll come back at me like a boomerang pretty soon…

          I regret it. The timing was bad and I could see clearly from her gaze I’d ruined her evening…

          like when I show people nurse nayirah, ask them what they think and once they’ve fallen 100% into the molasses explain to them why “fake testimony” is posted at the top of the video…

          My 1994 situation was Phil Donahue, young women punching women on stage and pulling hair, families intervened, terrible acting, my family took it all in like any normal talk show…

          Then reality got even weirder than fiction…

          Sorry about my Jon Oliver comment…

          much nicer to read you empowered…

        • alexandre says:

          “…saying I didn’t think humans were responsible for climate change.”

          You said that out loud? Are you insane?? Oh my god! In what way it’s coming back at you like a boomerang?

          My “friend”, the bassist, told my sister to burn all my “conspiracy” videos (as if they’re all on VHS). We’re really going Winston here, for real.

          But fear not, dear MBP, I’m empowering myself again. Difficult to explain since it involves a “changing of the eye”, i.e. another perspective, a real shift in perspective on which I’m working since circa 2005. Slowly I’m getting it and words like “purpose”, “function” or “meaning” are losing…well, meaning. Sister says: “my life went to shit”. Mine too, but only when looked from that old perspective, where life has a purpose or meaning (function, utility, target). From the other perspective it’s like saying “Damn, that Volkswagen didn’t fly to Mars. Damn it!!” I mean, flying to Mars is not a function of a Volkswagen, so why are you expecting it to do so? Difficult to put into words without sounding like spiritual bullshit, but, like Ayahuasca showed me so clearly that consciousness without ego is possible (I never thought it actually was), so life without meaning and purpose is also possible, and from that new perspective, it’s as obvious as voluntarism/anarchism to Larken Rose. This is connected to Mahayana Buddhism and all sorts of complications, but I’m slowly getting it in a real empirical (and occidental/local/personal) way.

          “The thing is not to answer the question, but to realize that it’s not a question.” – I’m sure some aikido master must have said some slogan like that already. It always sounds spiritual bullshit.

          How’s that for empowered? Too green?

          • manbearpig says:

            Hey Alexandre,

            In my Monday morning pre-hamsterwheel marathon frenzy, a life-style I’ve chosen, I have no time to respond adequately and/or satisfactorily to your provocative post.

            All I have time to say right now is

            Thanks! It made my day!

            You sure do have an amazing way of expressing yourself!

            Would hilarity still be possible with no ego?

            • alexandre says:

              No need to reply, unless you want to. Hilarity – not to be confused with Hilary – is possible ONLY with no ego. Ego should be a helper, a good producer, a partner of the person, the guy in the financial department, the warehouse manager, but unfortunately he took the place of the director and this is reflected in the current aviation, where you have an executive hamster in charge of an airplane that gets complicated by the day in the inverted proportion as the hamster gets dumber. That’s us; life gets complicated, ego gets dumber. But who knows. It’s just possibilities – not to be confused with Herbie Hancock’s album.

    • Mintaka says:

      alexandre,
      Totally in sync with your experience there.
      Indeed when you haven’t watched that TV for as long as you have – for me it’s about 10 years too – then seeing it again (usually because you happen to be in a place where that thing is on) is like watching something from another planet, or watching some kind of fringe movie as you put it.

      IMO, it’s a good thing. Something to be thankful for.
      It shows how you can unplug yourself (or at least make a start) from that Matrix of Illusion, simply by turning that tube thing off. Have personally found it to be a liberating experience.
      It’s the same with mobile phones. Only use my phone for calling & texting, that’s it. Often don’t even have it on me, more than happy to leave it home. For many of my peers (in the ICT world), this is unfathomable.
      Sure, you miss out on certain things, but the positives 𝐟𝐚𝐫 outweigh the negatives.
      Technology has its place, but only up to a certain degree, the Mark in the Sand.
      And we have come to a point where we have 𝐟𝐚𝐫 over-stepped that mark.
      Technology isn’t the Be All, End All that is going to save humanity, quite the reverse.
      Work 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 (Mother) Nature, not against her.
      That should be our path.

      • alexandre says:

        Very true, Mintaka. Still, I just posted something above about some “changing of the eye” that may be pertinent to the subject. Maybe not, but when you hammer a nail for a thousand years and the nail doesn’t move, maybe we need to pause and think about it. Something like that.

        My TV marathon is over (it was just youtube videos, since I don’t have a TV anymore in the house) and it was really weird, like seeing the world underwater or something. You recognize everything but it’s all so different. Really Matrix stuff.

  11. HopefulOne says:

    Questions for Corbett

    Mr. Corbett,

    I truly enjoyed you “9-11 trillions, Follow the Money” video. It caused me to think about both the fluoride issue as well as the “spraying” (geoengineering) issue.

    So far, I haven’t read anything about specifically ‘who’ benefits from the financial side of both of those very widespread activities.

    Clearly, none of us subjected to it benefit, so who does?

    In the case of the spraying, who is supplying the funds to carry it out, and who is reaping the profits from doing so?

    Perhaps something has already been created in the alt media. If so, I would be grateful to be directed to it.

    Thank you for all you do, with precision and integrity.

    • Mintaka says:

      HO,
      The fluoride they put in our water is a waste product from the fertilizer industry. Instead of said industry having to pay to somehow dispose of this waste, they sell it off to the water companies (or governments) for them to add it to the drinking water because it is allegedly good for our teeth (Ha!).
      So not only does the fertilizer industry directly profit, so do the middle-men.
      Ultimately, it is you, the consumer that pays, not only in financial terms, but in terms of your health.
      It’s quite the scam.

      There are numerous resources that cover this issue.

    • stephen11 says:

      If I may HopefulOne, the flouride issue has been discussed thoroughly in the ‘alt’ community and I will summarize as such: It’s purpose is to ‘dumb you down’ and make you more docile. This serves to benefit one the same way a conman benefits when someone is easily duped.

      The ‘spraying’ topic, or stratospheric injection, or chemtrails, if you please, is still a fringe subject. There are a couple Corbett Reports about the subject. Honestly, I need to watch them again myself.

      There are plenty of common sense observations one can make to see that something is up. Like why do some planes produce long streams of vapor/dust while others don’t. What is the commonality of all these smoggy planes? Boeing screwing up again? Why does this smoggy vapor-dust spread out and form with the other trails to form an overcast haze?

      Some, who still have their memory, can simply remember when there were only contrails from wing tips that soon disappeared from the sky. Now, you have these long streams that stay and spread out. They still call these contrails.

      I remember when the Olympics was in China and the US news was broadcasting a story on how the Chinese government was seeding clouds to prevent a storm from raining out the events. This ‘cloud seeding’ idea has been around since the 50’s, maybe before. Some, nowadays, don’t believe anything like spraying is happening at all.

      In my opinion, the purpose is to test the technology and to blame any outcome on climate change to further this agenda to commoditize every resource while also creating an entirely new trading market they can rig.

      Also, stratospheric injection, links with other fringe topic, HAARP.

    • HomeRemedySupply says:

      HopefulOne,
      James Corbett has a “SEARCH BAR” at the top of the page which I find invaluable.
      However, I often can find Corbett Report content just by doing a web search with DuckDuckGo. Type “Corbett Report” plus your keywords.

      CHEMTRAILS
      I once ran some tests on chemtrail residue in near east Texas (circa 2007-2008). A previous Corbett Report guest, Peter Kirby, wrote an article about the ‘private’ airport which harbors chemtrail planes less than 30 miles from where I ran the tests.
      In fact, one of my Toxicology Instructors worked at the installation, and I had always suspected that airfield of hosting the spraying planes.

      If you follow the links in this link, you will see a variety of anecdotes and some videos.
      https://www.corbettreport.com/everything-gold-is-new-again-what-qe4-means-for-you/#comment-67456

      In my comment just below the above linked comment, there is some interesting info about ALUMINUM

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        HopefulOne, You will see a lot of info about Fluoride from Corbett when you do a search.

        FLUORIDE
        This Wednesday, Feb 12th 2020, Activists in Dallas will again be at City Hall speaking about fluoride.

        At our Dallas For Safer Water website, are a wide variety of Corbett Report videos about fluoride.
        One of my favorites is James discussing fluoride in Japan.
        Scroll down the website’s Home Page and you will see it.
        https://www.dallasforsaferwater.com/

        • alexandre says:

          I read the word FLUORIDE and had to comment because I just spent 50 minutes standing on a line at the post office. The torture of waiting in line may be because I’m 55 and complaining about torture is a thing of the past century, a bygone epoque, but what I noticed was that I was the only one feeling the torture (of which the physical part is but one smaller aspect). Every one else was smiling, chatting, scrolling their phones and happy as can be. Just once I heard a wee very low whisper “Jesus…” from the woman behind me. So I thought: “FLUORIDE”! That must be it. Or something else, because fluoride must be an antique by now. Surely they have more modern drugs to make people smile in a torture chamber. But then again I would be also happy, since I live in the same place they do, breathe the same air and drink the same water. So how does this work? Is it person specific? Am I immune to artificial government sponsored happiness? Does SOMA not work on me? I don’t know, just something I thought. The positive smiles are getting weirder and weirder, so it must be drugs.

        • HopefulOne says:

          Thanks Stephen11 and HRS.

          I have read about how the chemtrails work, and why the geoengineering started, but not ‘who’ at this point in time is perpetuating the process, selling the the material used (and presumably profiting from it), and also ‘who’ is getting the $ for carrying out the operation.

          Watching the 2012 CR radio #232 suggested by Stephen11, about geoengineering for financial gain, I realized that there is an additional area for CR questioning: ‘who’ is currently benefiting from the disasters caused by recent geoengineering efforts?

          Much in the same way, I have seen a lot about fluoride being “industrial waste”, but (and perhaps I’ve missed it), nothing about exactly ‘who’ is profiting from the sale of such material to the various public water entities who dutifully place it in our water.

          I hope this more clearly describes what I was hoping to see and learn when “following the money” for these two issues.

          The breadth and depth of the resources of Mr. Corbett and his community are incredible. Great group of folks.

  12. HomeRemedySupply says:

    Thank you Mr. Corbett for answering my question and giving us your personal observations.
    I really appreciate the personal anecdotes, not only from you but also from other Corbett Report members.

    While a news article can paint a picture, personal anecdotes tend to add color and depth.

    I guess that Japan had a sales tax hike to 10% in the latter part of 2019. It seems that consumer spending (in the non-black market) is down. https://japantoday.com/category/business/Japan-household-spending-falls-more-than-expected-in-December

    Like you mentioned, these changing demographics across the globe are certainly going to have an effect on many aspects, especially economies.
    Fewer consumers, less spending.
    I have to laugh… The banks are printing ever rising amounts of currency, but with a declining population, the number of debtors is falling.

    ~~~
    PS
    I’m late to the comment boards.
    At the new year, my routines/schedule have changed and life has gotten busier. But I manage to grab content on my phone when I can.
    Thanks again for what you do.

    • Mintaka says:

      HRS,
      “I have to laugh… The banks are printing ever rising amounts of currency, but with a declining population, the number of debtors is falling.”

      Now you remind me of the comment I made earlier in this thread regarding robots (AI) becoming the new legal debt slaves. The sky will be the limit.

      I agree with your sentiment how personal anecdotes add a lot of value to a conversation.
      IMO, far more than asking someone to read this or that link or watch this or that video. Look around your 𝐨𝐰𝐧 immediate area, get involved with the local politics or council, things like that and then you start to see the pattern and agenda (not to mention the (Fascist) cronyism and corruption) right in front of your eyes. At the Coal Face so to speak.
      Your experience with that airport that you suspect of being used as a base for chem-trail spraying. This is a valuable insight, from direct personal experience.

      I am actually still sitting on the fence when it comes to chem-trails (yes, a bit late to the party), but the reason is simple.
      In my neck-of-woods (the South Pacific) I can see no visual evidence of anything out of the ordinary when it comes to contrails left by planes. Most of the time they don’t leave any at all. Nothing different from what I remember as a kid growing up in Europe.
      So I don’t know, need to see more concrete evidence. No idea how this compares to the US, it may be very real there.
      Mind you, why would the spraying of some kind of chemical or metallic compound require any contrail at all? Especially at nano level?

      What I 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 noticed is the sudden change of flight paths of planes coming in and leaving the airport. This happened here about 5 years ago now and have also become aware that something identical is happening at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport.
      Where in the past planes would be kept away from populated areas, now they’re sent directly over them! And they’re coming up with all sorts of crazy reasons as to why. New runways, SMART routes (now there’s something to question if it has the SMART word in it), shorter flight paths to save fuel, etc.

      My question is, has anyone else noticed this same pattern?

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        Mintaka,
        I love reading your posts and anecdotes.

        The normal airport flight patterns in my area have pretty much stayed the same, but the chemtrail flight patterns are unpredictable.

        One of the links via my link above is for “real time radar”.
        It is interesting to watch and then go outside to see the planes.

  13. Ragnar says:

    “All right, there’s our target.

    Yes, that’s a rabbet hole.

    What? Of course we’re going in!

    What are you, chicken?

    Ready, Jump!”

    When I see or hear someone reference the Georgia Guidestones even I will roll my eyes, knowing what’s coming. But Ted Turners conspiracy triggering globalist manifesto is worth considering. The enigmatic line about keeping the global population st 500 million seems like a horrifically small number considering our what, 8 + billion population currently. You only have to look at what other “luminaries” have said or wished for to see that this isn’t beyond the realm of possibility to their twisted ideology. So while we will see articles about a low population “crisis”, I think things are moving towards that small population number, just like they planned. Well, perhaps not as quickly, but as the saying goes “Slowly slowly catchee monkey”.

  14. Gary says:

    Hi James,

    As a side note, Kentucky just got conceal carry without a permit for firearms early last year. Yay! Crime here has never been lower.

    It’s been happening in the OH/KY/IN Tri-state region surrounding Cincinnati, OH too. Of particular note are Walmart, McDonalds, Burger King, Kroger, and United Dairy Farmers (UDF). These chain stores all used to have their outlets open 24 hours, except for McDonalds and Burger King, which have nearly always closed for a few hours each night across the country. The BK in Covington, KY used to be open 24 hours, and now is no longer open nearly that long. McDonalds next door keeps its drive thru open 24 hours, but now closes its dining area at night.

    Every once in awhile I will see a Speedway convenience store (of Speedway, Indiana) closed for a few hours, famous for their 24 hour stores. Walmart, Kroger, and UDF now close certain stores from 1 am to 5 am, with the rest remaining open in busier parts of town. Normally open at 5 am and 6 am, McDonalds and Burger King, respectively, will now not open their doors on Sunday until 7. I had wondered what was going on, and your podcast makes a lot of sense, as usual.

    The claim is that the Cincinnati area still experiences good annual growth, but taxes here are moderately high, and businesspeople in particular seem to be moving away to the no-income states like Tennessee and Texas.

    Gary Fowler
    Lakeside Park, KY

  15. alexandre says:

    Well, let’s start at the beginning. How is the population calculated?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=217649mIGEc&feature=youtu.be

    Ariano Suassuna was a playwright and author in the Northeast of Brazil and he used to say that there are three types of lies; the little lie, the big lie and statistics. My little point is that this is like talking about Jupiter. We have no way of knowing exactly the size of a population, so it’s a perfect way (yet another one) to control and justify whatever they want to do to us. Every talk on the subject is based on CENSUS, registration etc and I doubt that this is good enough. Maybe it’s close, you can have a good idea, but not enough to justify personal, political or scientific action. It’s yet another issue, that should be left alone, that the Technocrats use as they see fit – since there’s no way for us to prove they’re wrong. I think that it’s a non-subject, like the sex of angels. TruthStreamMedia coincidentally (or maybe everybody reads the same material) just did a piece on that… https://www.bitchute.com/video/ro7SZ1uEBTs/
    …where they analyze a NYT article admitting that all the Paul Erlich & friends bullshit of the past was wrong and now we’re in a population crunch etc. How can we know these things? It’s the same bridle they govern us with all the time, now to the left, now to the right, stop, go. Acting based on such statistics is just insane. “Oh, they say there’s too much people, so I won’t … have a CHILD”?? I almost had one long time ago, but due to complications we had to abort (which wasn’t fun), but talking about it with my then girlfriend the last word on our minds would have been “population”. I doubt that anyone, before having kids, first consult the World Population Data Sheet. It’s a ridiculous subject and its only use is for social engineering.

    (Did I use the word “bridle” correctly?)

    • generalbottlewasher says:

      Alex. Yes but only if you are riding a Pasofino. Thats another good thought. Who is doing the steering there. I saw a Real News story about São Paulo the other day. You also mentioned it being 540 sq.miles or something . How do things get done? Like a gig , how do you navigate the forest of buildings. I much prefer the tree forest but having seen the Real News drone shots that city is massive. People here have no clue. The scale, the scale of everything.

      https://youtu.be/-ydeQ6zb61Y

      How can you miss 3 million people?

      • alexandre says:

        Yes, we’re all Pasofinos!

        You bring a good point which is coincidentally related to my comment before (I think). I was born there and lived 45 years there, more or less. I never had any idea of what that term – São Paulo – meant, specially when people said things like “I love São Paulo”. What does that mean? My whole life there was spent navigating on a much smaller area and to this day if I go to the center (downtown?) I get lost. Things get done very poorly and have a look at it these last days, after heavy rainfall. Floods everywhere.

        https://globoplay.globo.com/v/8308876/

        I didn’t live in São Paulo, I lived in a small portion of it, a bit of the west and the south zones. That’s SP to me and it has nothing to do with what SP means to someone on the north zone. It’s a cluster of cities. When people say “I love SP” (or NY for that matter), they’re falling into the same “population” trap. Or similar. It’s patriotic and collectivist, turning you from Jeff or José into a “paulista” or “new yorker”. From an individual to a cell of an amorphous mass. It’s actually more like a small town of some 3000 millionaires surrounded by something a bit upwards of a favela.

        So yeah, it’s a big city, but the tallest building has only 51 floors. So there you go.

        The tallest “sky scraper” (laughter). And I have no idea where that is.
        https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirante_do_Vale

        • alexandre says:

          The line “It’s actually more like a small town of some 3000 millionaires surrounded by something a bit upwards of a favela.” should go somewhere else in the text. I had no time to edit. Sorry about that.

      • alexandre says:

        GBW, the link you sent looks like some propagandistic kind of thing – the guy on the motorbike, making SP look like some grand thing. Couldn’t watch that too much because it triggers my labyrinthitis – that Go Pro camera kind of thing. Argh.

        But is this the Real News article you mentioned?
        https://therealnews.com/stories/brazil-fighting-housing-rights-sao-paulo

        In any case, that’s quite interesting. I dated a woman once that was a lawyer who defended the people occupying buildings like that. Very interesting, reminds me of the Argentinean “toma”.

        • generalbottlewasher says:

          Alex thats the one. The labyrinths of the motorcycle guy is a ground view compared to the housing report with the drones and wide angle views. Its amazing to see that some things work better inspite of central governments intrusive overbearing presence. Then as things get slightly better, and more uppity the NeoFascist types are sent in to tamp that down though ownership right and restoring privilege and installing feudalism.
          Im in a 300,000 population of majority white ,richer entitled old oil and new data and property speculation financial neo- fascists. We are still battling a race riot that burned the colour out 100years ago. Your perspective has been enlighting to say the least. Pulling at the threads to unravel the imbalance is what I got from the Sao Paulo housing report.
          We got our vacant government buildings that are useless space. The latest , today looks at renovating a derelict building downtown into a Veterans Hospital. We will spend $40 million to give the strong arm racketeers enforcers a hospital cause they busted a nut stealing the resources of some foreign country. While segregating dying people to a homeless shelter. Out of balance and getting worse. Perceptions are generally not what they seem and a little tug on a loose thread may bring it back from the supposed brink of… Im a thead puller I guess. Im curious to pull back the curtain or throw back the blanket to see what’s being hidden. Its a curse.

  16. manbearpig says:

    so I’m posting this just ’cause I’m pissed off at getting a 404 message now when you click on the link (that I’ve posted multiple times over the years on these boards.) For the record, the passages below the link are copy/pastes. I’m not good at technology, Can anyone help me out with this?

    http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPA2009/WPA2009_WorkingPaper.pdf

    “…Population ageing is pervasive since it is affecting nearly all the countries of the world. Population ageing results mainly from reductions of fertility that have become virtually universal…”

    ƒ”…Because fertility levels are unlikely to rise again to the high levels common in the past, population ageing is irreversible and the young populations that were common until recently are likely to
    become rare over the course of the twenty-first century…”

    “…Currently, the total fertility rate is below the replacement
    level in practically all industrialized countries. In the less developed regions, the fertility decline started later and has proceeded faster than in the more developed regions…” (perhaps massive tetanus vaccination campaigns laced with HCG might have something to do with this phenomenon…)

    “…The process underlying global population ageing is known as the “demographic transition”, a process whereby reductions in mortality, particularly at young ages, are followed by reductions in fertility…”

    “…The reduction of fertility has been dramatic since 1950. At the world level, total fertility has dropped almost by half, from 4.9 children per woman in 1950-1955 to 2.6 in 2005-2010, and it is expected to keep on declining to reach 2.0 children per women in 2045-2050.
    Fertility is well below replacement level in the more developed regions.
    As a result of the sustained decline in fertility that occurred in developed countries during the twentieth century, total fertility in the more developed regions has dropped from an already low level of 2.8 children per woman in 1950-1955 to an extremely low level of 1.6 children per woman in 2005-2010.
    This level is well below that needed to ensure the replacement of generations (about 2.1 children per woman). In fact, practically all developed countries are currently experiencing below-replacement fertility.
    United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division 5
    Fertility decline in the less developed regions started later and has proceeded faster.
    Major fertility reductions in the less developed regions occurred, in general, during the last three decades of the twentieth century. From 1950-1955 to 2005-2010, total fertility in the developing world dropped by over half from 6.0 to 2.7 children per woman (figure 2)…”

    etc. etc. etc…

    un.org/esa/population/publications/WPA2009/WPA2009_WorkingPaper.pdf

    thinking you in advance…

  17. Hi James,

    How many U.S. intelligence agencies do you know of and how likely do you think it is that the CIA has become a sacrificial anode for the lesser-known agencies, allowing them to operate uninhibited?

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