How to Research Online - #SolutionsWatch

02/08/202230 Comments

James Corbett delivers a live presentation on How to Research Online to the Greater Reset Activation III conference on January 30, 2022. In this demonstration, James shares his screen while he answers some research questions from his listeners.

Watch on Archive / BitChute / Minds / Odysee or Download the mp4

*The website for accessing paywalled science articles is Sci-Hub

Filed in: Solutions Watch

Comments (30)

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  1. hugo.c says:

    Dear James,

    I was going to start with a question: “How much coffee did you drink before this presentation?” but thought better of it 😉

    Thanks for posting this. Well done.

    I only got one “tool” from it, archive.today, but I may use it. What I really liked was your “okay, sleeves up, here we go” attitude. I’m very glad that you got to the WHO document at the end and were able to put that in the context of the 2006 treaty for pandemic preparedness (or whatever its called). A lovely place to sign off.

    Research often does not go where one thinks it will. This is not always a bad thing either.

    Your enthusiasm, and an unusually warm and bright sunny day in northern Europe has lifted my spirits.

    Peace be with you.

    • hugo.c says:

      On a related note, the publications which I issue largely use opinion as references, which is very different from identifying the source of a phrase or finding a publication. This is a price for commenting on current affairs.

      I do rely, however, on RSS as a tool for collating my “interesting” sources.

      I thought perhaps I could relate my method for source compilation for my articles as a method that others may find interesting/useful. Recall, the purpose is to provide commentary on recent geopolitical events which present an alternative narrative to the garbage coming out of the dinosaur media.

      On a daily basis I read the topics I find interesting in my RSS feed, and always any article by persons I find most valuable. I often visit references cited in interesting articles, and from this can expand my RSS feed when I find gold.

      As I do this, I note in my reference format [Title, Author, Publication, Date, Link] any article which I found informative *and* interesting. These lists of “interesting articles” are saved by week, and as I use a reference in an article it is moved in the list into a “has been used” section, but remains in the weekly list.

      After a few days my subconscious will start wriggling and some inspiration will emerge which links at least three of the recent “interesting” articles. From this a narrative is constructed to weave the sources together. As I write I make “wild claims” based upon my decade plus of historical research (much of which is due to our James) and then dig to find references to justify my claims.

      Then its its polishing and polishing …

      Here’s a recent article on the whole Ukraine silly:

      https://yesxorno.substack.com/p/usnatorussiasco-reality-asserts-itself

      Or, here’s one of the “interesting” articles, in my “reference” format, which I’m going to have much trouble integrating. It is written plainly, but requires a little pause to read. We’re talking about geopolitical economics, and I’m not an economist. But, I love Michael Hudson’s analysis. It is most thought provoking:

      America’s Real Adversaries Are Its European and Other Allies, Michael Hudson, Unz Review, 2022-02-07
      https://www.unz.com/mhudson/americas-real-adversaries-are-its-european-and-other-allies/

      Enjoy,

      2-D Chess Dweller

  2. Control Savvy says:

    Wow! That was incredibly useful to me! Thanks, James.

    1. I knew nothing about enabling or disabling scripts. Looking into it.
    2. It looks like the burning of the Library of Alexandria is well under way. Again and again you came up against disabled pages or pages hidden behind various excuses.
    3. I already knew about archive.org and Wayback Machine (thanks to you), but I haven’t tried to use it. Thanks for the reminder.
    4. This is one of those videos I will have to go back and watch several times.

    Question

    How do you do that thing where you get to a page and put in search words for that page alone?

  3. spider says:

    OS -> Linux
    Browser -> Brave
    Search engine -> Brave
    Videos -> Odysee
    Webpage search -> https://archive.ph/
    News -> GlobalResearch.ca
    More Boolean Operators -> AND OR NOT () + – *

  4. HomeRemedySupply says:

    Finding deleted Youtube Videos on Bitchute
    (Applicable for deleted Derrick Broze YouTube videos, but might also apply to other people.)

    Read this brief Sub-Thread for the full trail and current Fluoride News…
    https://www.corbettreport.com/holidayopenthread/#comment-127732

    A brief recap rendition:
    Derrick Broze had a YouTube video which exposes the unfounded rumor that
    “Nazi Germany used Fluoride in the water to control people.”
    That specific YouTube video was deleted by YouTube which I discovered when I went to an old past comment which linked to the YouTube video.
    By using the YouTube code F60-cYVA9_A, I added it to the Bitchute base.
    Here is the deleted YouTube video on Bitchute…
    (Go to the 19:50 mark) – https://www.bitchute.com/video/F60-cYVA9_A/

  5. buz says:

    Fantastic fabulous I have done all the things you did in your video and it never fails that I get more trails to follow, more questions I want answered, and further references to check out. Problem is sometimes, I never get back to the original inquiry. I’m laughing because you are so good at staying on point. Thank you James, for your discipline and ability to not get distracted. I hope I can follow that lead not branch off into obscurity as often as I do. Good video bravo mon ami! your pal, Buz

  6. 8Gc58 says:

    When it comes to advanced searches, this page is useful:

    What are Boolean operators? How can I use them to improve my searches?
    Boolean is a set of commands that can be used in almost every search engine, database, or online catalogue. The most popular Boolean commands are AND, OR, and NOT. Other commands include parentheses, truncation, and phrases.

    https://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/faq/what-are-boolean-operators-how-can-i-use-them-improve-my-searches

    (Personally, I’m not sure if it’s correct calling quotations / phrases for a boolean operator. However, that is a minor detail.)

  7. 8Gc58 says:

    SOME RESOURCES

    On web research, I would like to share a few resources as well. SingleFile and Web Archives, are good extensions. As well as Archive Page that is a Firefox addon to archive pages to archive.today, in one click. I’m sure you’ve got a similar one for Chromium based browsers.

    Inoreader is a great newsreader. It has many useful features, like following pages that don’t have RSS feeds and filters. And if you use Inoreader, it’s a great place to search through old articles.

    Another handy tool for saving articles is Wallabag. With the addon Wallabagger you can save articles with one click. Use can install Wallabag on your own server, or use a hosted version.

    And, to be a tad safer when browsing the internet, researching content, it might be worth looking into using a “virtual machine“. With a virtual machine, you have a “computer within the computer”. A sandboxed environment that you don’t have to be too worried about when searching (especially if you use a VPN, or TOR, as well).

    If you’re on Firefox, their Multi-Account Containers are great. And Sidebery is a very powerful Firefox extension that lets you do a lot of very nifty things. For example, you can do things like creating rules that open all google.com links in an own container, running TOR.

    • Duck says:

      True, virtual machines are pretty good.

      I also like to use live CD’s or USB… if you encrypt your computers hard drive (which Pop os offers by default) even if live OS gets compromised no one can read it. Link to a video for those who want to make a USB drive with multiple linux distros on it. You may need to save your downloads to another USB if yo uh have issues with persistence

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0yWnxAKaocY

      • 8Gc58 says:

        Good suggestion, Duck!

        I’ve tried out Tails OS. My problem is that “research” more or less happens all the time, so I don’t bother to reboot my computer that often. However, use cases differ.And, many might have an older second PC, that they can dedicate for research.

        A while back I did consider Qubes OS as my daily driver:
        “Qubes OS leverages Xen-based virtualization to allow for the creation and management of isolated compartments called qubes. These qubes, which are implemented as virtual machines (VMs)”

        • Duck says:

          I finally found and an old PC that runs Qubes but I have been busy and not played with it much.

          Tails is pretty good and I like how you can clone a new USB off an old one.
          Parrot linux is lovely to look at and super normie friendly with the Anon Surf button but a lot of the time I just run a Raspberry Pi single board computer- they are so cheap you could have 3 set up for different online tasks 🙂 if you think it’s time it’s a 10 min job to reflash the camera card it runs off and your back to the start.
          TBH I bet 95% of people can just a pi4 for everything they do online.

          It’s nice to meet you and see others are also worried about taking control of their own computing

          • 8Gc58 says:

            Parrot is all new to me. There are a lot of options in the world of Linux.

            I used to be on Windows, but in 2018 I made the move to Manjaro. Thanks to a super friendly community, I got a lot help whenever I was stuck with something. Since then I’ve only been on Linux, trying out different distros. I’ve never looked back to Windows.

            Using a Raspberry Pi as a research computer is a good idea.

            Likewise, Duck! It feels great taking more control of the tool I use the most. If you ever get to try out Qubes, please let us know how you like it.

  8. mkey says:

    “Individual human rights”

    Does any type other than individual exist? Collectivist human rights? I have never heard of those. It’s like saying: time to stamp out bipedal humans. Distinction without a difference.

    • Duck says:

      Mikey

      You do have things like collective rights with communitys…. a village or a family or a tribe or a nation or such certainly have rights as a group. Water or grazing rights, community policing, even land rights

      The focus on the single individual is not exactly bad. But the loss of group identity leaves people at the mercy of the powerful imo that’s why it has been cultivated in industrial societies the same as group identity of Indians or Australian aborigine was attacked by westerners via boarding schools and such abuses

  9. ccuthbert2001 says:

    Frontline episode The Nazi Connection is on Odysee. Download and save, please.

    https://odysee.com/@TheExpos%C3%A9:6/The-Nazi-Connection-(1987):2

  10. Paul says:

    I just wanted to let you know about a site that shows the full article for articles that a site only shows the full article to search engines.

    You know you have found such an article when you see in the search text of an article the words or sentence you are looking for, but when you click the link in the search engine, the site only shows you a paywalled version.

    https://12ft.io

    This site does its best to get around paywalls, in general, but I find it most useful when the site is showing a special version just for search engines.

    (Also note, the maintainer of the site recently added a bug to the page announcing that the cost of the site is outgrowing his budget.)

  11. pill says:

    ddg.gg requires less typing and you can even set up your browser to search DuckDuckGo for “who” when you type “d who” into the address bar, etc.

    Unfortunately, DuckDuckGo often ignores search terms and generally seems to get worse over time. On the other hand, Google auto-corrects everything you type in into something similar that you didn’t ask for.

    The sad reality is that most search engines aren’t real search engines but only meta search engines, browsing through the results provided by at least the one global search index, Google.

    • productive says:

      Absolutely, they don’t crawl the search Googles databases and their quarantine list instead of looking up links

      I use Brave and a few others

  12. productive says:

    Thank you James, I would love for you to do more on this topic of how to research. I know I could benefit from it because I do quite a bit of research but today almost everything is wiped from the internet. Google owns most of the search engines (96% of the internet and 84% of the world search)
    Most people don’t even know how to research today and I think more detail on this topic would do a lot to help wake up people to how they are being manipulated and lied to.

    Please do a research series on this. I did learn a few tools like:

    Sci-Hub for scientific literature
    Archive
    And the search feature in documents
    How does one do that on a phone?

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