Interview 1066 – Financial Survival: Free Speech Isn’t Free

07/30/20153 Comments

censorshipsquareOn this week’s edition of Financial Survival James and Alfred discuss free speech (or lack thereof) in Canada, and whether the US will be far behind with hate speech laws and censorship. Also on the table for discussion: gold market manipulation, the global government agenda and whether the Chinese would make good stewards of the global economy.

SHOW NOTES:
Canada Is A Tinpot Dictatorship

“This isn’t Canada anymore”

“Into the Fire” – Toronto G20

Overcoming Learned Helplessness

B.F. Skinner’s “Walden Two” – FLNWO #17

Gold touches 5yr low, as China suspected of heavy selling

Fake Numbers From China

China’s GDP is “man-made,” unreliable: top leader

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  1. nosoapradio says:

    Certainly China does not have the monopoly on mendacity. Especially considering that they are largely influenced if not entirely controlled by western financial powers.

    Whatever institutionalized conciliatory and exonerating Chinese expression that exists meaning: “a lie to protect the honor of… my mother in law”…

    is merely comparable to the elastic concept of the “white lie” to keep the peace.

    That China should seek to institutionalize “social credits”:

    http://www.ibtimes.com/china-use-big-data-rate-citizens-new-social-credit-system-1898711

    is proof that China is certainly almost naively more up front and honest than the West who, in the name of freedom and democracy pretends, perhaps in a hypocritical, pro-Skinnerian way, that they are not doing exactly the same thing.

    On a wholly other subject:

    Would Alfred Addis be seeking a partner? as I’m sure my Mom, an opinionated Yankee Texas fanatic, who is a widow, ex-activist and Columbia University graduate who used to be a misunderstood Glamour magazine cover girl, would find him absolutely irresistable from every point of view?

    p.s.: and Thanks, Mr Corbett, for answering my question about that sudden massive sale of Chinese gold.

  2. twrman83536 says:

    Martin Armstrong has a very good analysis of the gold market today on his blog and he also has watched these markets for years and his Economic Confidence Model he has constructed has backed his analysis without fail. His predictions will once again prove up I have no doubt.

  3. VoltaicDude says:

    For the sake of relative brevity, compared to the amount of subject matter I’d like to cover, I’ll present my comment in bullets

    1) Another great podcast – thanks James and Alfred!

    2) False flag police operations during political demonstrations! – Very important. Good doc…

    The Miami Model
    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-miami-model/

    Miami model
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_model

    3) Anti-free speech policies! Great segue way – from governmental speech-banning to corporate media control.

    Ties to Chomsky – “Manufacturing Consent” – title is a quote the book “Public Opinion,” by political-writer/”socialist” Walter Lippmann.

    This is the Orwellian model mostly in practice to date in the Empire – alternative information is easily accessible by most, yet corporate media reigns none-the-less (money circles and social engineering).

    The underlying logic of free-speech policies creates a complex of conflicting tendencies which together actually present as a “dilemma.”

    “Dilemma” and the exploitation of “dilemmas” is an important tool of the Orwellian inverted-fascist police state.

    4) Point to the contrary: the American healthcare system is comparatively and rightly the joke of the entire developed world’s healthcare systems, albeit there are problems to be found in all of them – obviously, especially at the anecdotal level.

    I don’t mean to be simplistic, nor in fact to suggest that the sources below are totally unbiased, but there are overwhelming demographic realities illustrating how America’s healthcare system is the worst system for the average citizen, and the best system for the bankster shadow government.

    Canada vs. US Health Care Systems – Debunking Canadian … – AARP
    http://member.aarp.org/politics-society/government-elections/info-03-2012/myths-canada-health-care.htmlhttp://member.aarp.org/politics-society/government-elections/info-03-2012/myths-canada-health-care.html

    Canada vs United States Health Stats Compared – NationMaster.com
    http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Canada/United-States/Health

    Comparing the U.S. and Canadian Health Care Systems
    http://www.nber.org/bah/fall07/w13429.html

    Comparison of the health care systems in Canada and the United States
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_the_health_care_systems_in_Canada_and_the_United_States

    Again, myriad persuasive anecdotal horror stories about U.S. healthcare are also easy to find.

    5) A centralized command-economy – YES! It’s the defining quality of our bankster empire, cloaked in a Wizard-of-Oz-like dazzle of free-market mythology.

    This is where it gets interesting – James, I’m a huge fan of your reading of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon – an important, oft neglected, further education for most political activists.

    And this is where the concept of “dilemma” becomes so strong – there is a problem with the automatic usage of the term free-market without any sense its limitations.

    Money does not grow on trees, likewise the market-place is not some naturally occurring geologic spot: neither literally nor figuratively.

    Why do we base our political/economic arguments on something so obviously fictitious and problematically derailing of a clear-headed pursuit of social justice?

    The “free” in free-market is meant to connote “natural,” and that is how it is generally (if only unconsciously) understood, with little reflection on the absurdity of the notion – it’s something we have been conditioned to take for granted.

    Tying back to healthcare, we need to understand that the modern, hi-tech-driven medical practice that few of us are willing to throw out wholesale (baby and all) is not possible as a simplistic social construct. We can address that complexity consciously, or be stuck, spinning our wheels, trying to manipulate it without fully seeing the reality of it.

    We might not like that because it suggests that it requires that we consider conventions and even the dreaded “social contract” in order to make sense of it all – which will invariably again lead to certain dilemmas as a result of competing ‘interests.”

    What should our standards be? That is the question.

    The question can’t be whether we have standards at all, because we can’t exist without “standards” of some sort. People are like cheese, we need to be cultured to be complete, and even biologically functional – ask any feral child!

    The problem is that so many standards we live be are obsolete, or wrong-headed (often an understatement), or mutually contradictory, or just not even recognized as such, but just taken for granted.

    Perhaps the trick is to develop “sophisticated” standards that in themselves incorporate pluralism? One can argue that this has historically been the ongoing project since at least Locke.

    The “truth” movements are important in this respect. We cannot just automatically fix everything, but we know quite a few things that are very demonstrably in need of fixing.

    The push-back to these corrections comes from social conventions that support “the powers that shouldn’t be” and that suppress the truth through psychological and social pressures.

    6) Best quote from this podcast: (at 18:52 min.) “Bing, bing, bing, we have a winner.”– in all it entails.

    A few more documentaries along this line:

    Save Our Land, Save Our Town
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0r9fINEvsJA

    Who Killed the Electric Car?
    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/who-killed-the-electric-car/
    (note: This doc does not answer the question definitively – only that it was somehow the oil companies, but how do they control GM? In fact it was a bankster-class decision – oil is the biggest bankster heist ever, and bankster interests are centralized with the Fed and the petrodollar – it’s a club. While GM’s Bank (Ally Fin. now) is in recent history only about a quarter to a third in net revenue to GMC, the oil industry originally made Chase and Citibank (the big central banksters) the largest banks in the world. They were not about to give that up for some upstart, successful R&D project from the bowels of GMC.)

    Taken for a Ride” Documentary About the Auto industry
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zy37YoQ2CJw
    (…and the death of mass transit – GM and Francis Dupont! – 30:00min.)

    The Corporation (Full Documentary)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4ou9rOssPg
    Probably everyone here knows this one, but it’s still a good and important doc.

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