Interview 1065 – Financial Survival: The Liquidity Crisis

07/24/20156 Comments

liquidity-100x100As James returns from his summer holiday, he re-joins Alfred Adask for their weekly conversation on Financial Survival. This week they discuss the “resolution” of the Greek crisis, the growing panic over the liquidity crisis in the bond market, and whether or not the Iranian “deal” is actually a treaty.

SHOW NOTES:

Greek Parliament Approves Bailout Measures As Syriza Fragments

Greek PM Tsipras Allegedly Asked Russia for $10 Bln to Print Drachmas

IMF Declares War On Germany: In “Secret” Report Lagarde Says Greece Will Need Massive Debt Relief

Goldman Sachs Doesn’t Have Clean Hands in Greece Crisis

Financial Warfare: The Recolonization of Korea. Seoul Black Monday. IMF Intervention in Korea

This Week’s Gold Crash Reminds Us Of A Much Scarier Risk In The Markets

Fixing the Fed’s Liquidity Mess

Treasury Flash Crash of October 15, 2014 Still Has Wall Street in a Sweat

Iran Deal: A Treaty Or Not A Treaty, That Is The Question

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  1. EYEisBloke says:

    Good to have you back James, hope you and family had an excellent break. 🙂

  2. BuddhaForce says:

    The whole “advice and consent” of the Senate in regards to the ratifying of a Treaty is mighty humorous. The reason it was constructed that way was to keep matters of international trade and other affairs out of the hands of “uneducated” and “thoroughly unprincipled” men (read anyone who wasn’t in the aristocracy). It’s no coincidence that members of the Senate were elected by the governing bodies of each state under the Constitution all the way up until 1913.

    In a way it makes sense though. I mean, why would the ruling elites of Europe (and elsewhere) want to break bread with a bunch of American farmers and shippers? They wouldn’t…

    • candideschmyles says:

      I wonder if you, or anyone else, has come across a concise yet meaningful family tree of connection spanning European expansion in the Americas to the present day?

  3. candideschmyles says:

    Glad to have you back James after some well deserved family time. As someone geographically isolated from family I know how precious such occasions are and I’m glad it was exhausting… It should be! But I have missed the content so back to work 🙂

  4. bourinus says:

    Good to have you back James!

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