I Watch The Super Bowl Commercials (So You Don’t Have To!) – #PropagandaWatch

02/08/201943 Comments

Watch this video on BitChuteDTube / YouTube

Another Stupor Bowl has come and gone to dazzle the masses and, as many already know, the commercials are where many of the big propaganda themes for the year are introduced. So this year, video editor Broc West introduces some of the worst ones to me for my take on the cavalcade of conditioning. That’s right, in this edition of #PropagandaWatch you can literally watch me watching propaganda in real time! Ain’t the internet grand?

SHOW NOTES:
COMMERCIAL #1 – TurboTax Live 2019 Super Bowl Commercial “RoboChild”

COMMERCIAL #2 – Mapping the future of our forests with Microsoft AI

COMMERCIAL #3 – SimpliSafe: “Fear Is Everywhere”

COMMERCIAL #4 – Not Everything Makes the Cut – Amazon

COMMERCIAL #5 – Washington Post Super Bowl message: Democracy Dies in Darkness

The Question Concerning Technology

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Filed in: Videos

Comments (43)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. calibrator says:

    GREAT idea for a video – kudos to Broc!

    This was very interesting indeed, as I practically don’t watch ads anymore (except for movie trailers, but most of these suck, too).

    I don’t watch ads, let alone American ones (except movie trailers but they usually suck, too).
    But of course I remember many from my childhood & adolescence.

    Watching spots these I really felt dread & disgust.

    How desensitized are we to not do more than a “thumbs down”-click?
    (you know, the “comfy type of democracy” – the one that is taken away from us, too)

    How dumb have we become that they are so brazen in their propaganda that they don’t really care if the message is actually believed?

    How far have we come that they all get away with it?

    I mean advertising consumer stuff like actual products is one thing, but this was mostly propaganda of the “Jesus saves!” kind.

    “Believe (in) us, because!”

    I can readily imagine the powers that be deciding on a macro-level like “And roll out the PR campaign to bring the acceptancy numbers up!”.

    But what kind of people-hating assholes create such spots?

    The folks that actually write & produce the spots? The latte-sipping turds in their turtlenecks? Are they proud of their “work”?

    And Broc was 100% spot on about Fords acting in the last decade.
    I don’t know if he is a greedy geezer or just stupid – but fuck him: The pooch has better acting chops!

    His motto is likely “Worse than Willis”!

    (OK, I stop the word games now…)

    The only fun part was watching James writhe in pain.
    Reminded me a bit of Clockwork Orange… 😉

    So, please do another one next year!

    • generalbottlewasher says:

      Calibrator… Thats what I got from it. The distopian world of Anthony Burgess popped into my head. The visual impressiom was Alec and his druggies reacting to the forced narrative of the corporate state. I wanted to smash it up and got a strong whiff of ultaviolence from the images. Especially the robot and Alexa shot and bingo the safe ” home” in neon. How freaken weird. Bullocks!

      • russ says:

        You’re both right.

        A few years ago Ad Age did a survey of the Super Bowl ads to find reader favorites. The majority, if memory serves, were from the latter part of the 20th century. I responded it was because the writers of these ads–whether a 1 million dollar 60-second spot (then), or a full page magazine ad–did not have the command of the language the earlier writer’s did, especially where humor was concerned.

        Good, succinct humor is difficult to pull off if you’re not aware of the many nuances involved, especially within a 60-second television spot. You can force a piece of humor in into 60 seconds, but the viewer recognizes it instantly. The same principle applies to ads that ring true with viewers and reader, and those that don’t.

        Going forward it’s going to get worse. A lot worse with impatient twitter monkeys looking for the shortcut.

        A sample or two of some couple good humor ads:

        Herding cats: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk7yqlTMvp8

        Trunk monkey(15 and 30 second ads):

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XW8iAVwt_Yc

        • russ says:

          Wrong link for Trunk Monkey above. Apologies.

          https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5i5tst

        • manbearpig says:

          Cat herding… I thought that was one of Pearl’s humurous inventions?!… or was that butterfly herding…

          the trunk monkey… the speeding ticket, aliens, the teenage date

          urban legends exploiting urban legends creating new urban legends…. clichés and memes thrice, four times, fifteen times removed…

          that is culture…?

          Baudrillard was right…

          babelio.com/livres/Baudrillard-Simulacres-et-simulation/17686

          A summary:

          “Today, abstraction is no longer that of the map, the double, the mirror or the concept.
          Simulation is no longer that of a territory, a referential being, a substance.

          It is the generation by models of a reality without origin or reality: the hyperreal.

          The territory no longer precedes or survives the map. It is now the map that precedes the territory – precession of the simulacra – it is the map that generates the territory and if the fable had to be repeated, today it is the territory whose shreds slowly rot over the extent of the map.
          It is the real, not the map, whose remains remain here and there in the deserts that are no longer those of the Empire, but ours.

          The desert of reality itself…”

          or maybe I should knock off the absinthe…?

          • manbearpig says:

            In such a virtual reality, in this hall of mirrors reflecting symbols of symbols of symbols

            devoid of any actual substance

            I guess Humans could effect a sudden and devastating change in climate cycles through the tempestuous and unbridled emission of carbon dioxide gas…

            ?!

  2. SubArcticHoarder says:

    In the beginning of the Harrison Ford commercial, the guys says “you put Alexa in the microwave now?”

    I thought that was an excellent suggestion.

    • pi says:

      Well spotted second meaning…

      However, a suggestion to those planning to put an Alexa device into a microwave:
      scorching an electronic device may make your microwave oven unusable for food (toxic fumes form deposits on inside walls and front window).

      Oh, and don’t forget to put sunglasses on (bright white flames), or better put a camera with tripod in place and let the internet join in the fun.

    • HomeRemedySupply says:

      I like Harrison Ford’s dog. Sharper than many humans.

  3. Aphix says:

    RE: AI

    If I may, please, enjoy Professor James Mickens, fellow at Microsoft, and his recent presentation on AI at a Unix security conference (don’t worry, it’s totally funny even if you’re a non-techie):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajGX7odA87k

    TLDW; Why trust something inscrutable to perform tasks that *should* be scrutinized?

    Bonus: “James Mickens – Not Even Close, The State of Computer Security”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tF24WHumvIc

    E> (hacker heart),
    Aphix

    P.S. Keep it up, James; always a pleasure.

  4. manbearpig says:

    woke up to this and as usual I’m already late for work but I won’t have time later either so here goes:

    doublespeak

    remember when sam harris said

    “…take a moment to consider that the safest and only prudent way forward, recommended, would be to implant this technology directly onto our brains, now this may in fact Be the safest and most prudent way forward but usually one’s safety concerns about a technology have to pretty much be worked out before you stick it inside your head…”

    he appears to be mocking the idea when in fact it’s the central message of his presentation: we need to stick this tech onto our brains as quickly and safely possible if we’re to survive the coming singularity.

    well all of these stuporbowl clips were like this: they appeared to be negating what they were in fact selling, they used the fear of ambiant surveillance to sell ambiant surveillance, fear of fake news to sell you fake news, fear of maniacal robots to sell you maniacal robots etc etc.

    day before yesterday one of my business students wanted to watch a Ted Talk that another hotel manager friend of hers had sent her: it was with Brene Brown, we didn’t finish it but in her message “the power of vulnerability” about how we’re neurobiologically wired “for connection” she showed at 2:22 a sign of something her teacher always said: that read

    “if you can’t measure it, it doesn’t exist”

    …she made fun of it in a self-derisive sort of way, referred to it several times (the power of repetition as demonstrated by sam harris above) but embraced it as important to her…

    funny how these memes circulate at a given moment…the interconnectedness of it all…

    in the stupor bowl ads you can see the emotion-triggering symbols, blown out Murrah-type buildings, etc. and most notably the “wildfires” that burned down significant areas of california to get people emotionally committed to the product…to the message… you’re on my team aren’t you?

    and especially the message what an incredibly fun and unpredictable adventure melding with AI will be!! A veritable fiesta, a SUPER BOWL of mapping and measuring!!

    to exist

    you wanna exist don’t you? alexa’s dancing making the world pulse! don’t be a party pooper!

    • manbearpig says:

      The Earth pulsing to Alexa…

      Camazotz pulsing to IT…

      we’re caught in wrinkle in time…

      Sent from my really battered old Huawei phone.

    • charliebond says:

      Is it really lazy of me to want a like button so I can thumbs up peoples comments?

    • Octium says:

      As much as I’m against modern vaccinations I do think there is merit to the principle. If you receive a tiny dose of a virus that does not kill you now – you will be more resistant to it in the future.

      Before Richard Dawkins came out with the idea of memes, I had the idea of “Mind Viruses”. Ideas that spread between people’s minds like a virus.

      We could think of the ads as vaccines for mind viruses. If your average sheeple receives a tiny dose of negativity in the form of an ad (Alexa taking over the world in a harmless, humorous way) then when someone armed with real information (like a Corbett report subscriber) talks to them, they will be less surprised as they will have already seen it – and even if they are not dismissive of the facts, they will not pay deep attention as in their mind they have virtually lived through the scenario and survived.

      I think this is how predictive programming works.

      One of the reasons why I don’t watch TV myself is so that I can be truly surprised when I encounter a TV watcher who is talking about some dumb idea they caught from the TV.

      Only if I’m truly surprised, can I really engage them like it was *their* idea, and maybe make them question it by me questioning them.

      • manbearpig says:

        I think that’s a very perceptive analogy of the way predictive programming works: engineering tolerance… as a way of manufacturing consent…though vaccines are designed to build up more than tolerance but antibodies and resistance…

        I actually don’t watch TV either (except for some netflix) yet I’m just hypocritical enough to adore feigning shock and surprise when my entourage comes out with inanities sucked up from the tube… which may explain my limited powers of persuasion, come to think of it…

  5. HomeRemedySupply says:

    Prelude:
    I tend to buy German made beer – not American beer, because I don’t want fluoride in it.

    A Positive Note – ‘We’ helped to shape the narrative of the recent beer wars – Corn Syrup
    Many people are opposed to corn syrup for a variety of reasons, (e.g. GMO corn, corn syrup can be unhealthy, etc.)

    Bud ran a Super Bowl ad demonizing corn syrup. ($5 million for 30 seconds.) The ad mocked Miller and Coors for using corn syrup.
    See the link in my comment of Corbett’s fake news economic article…
    https://www.corbettreport.com/fake-news-economics-edition/#comment-59055

    It has escalated into a “big beer war”. Click “big beer war” at the link I mentioned.

    My point is that this is a positive on how the public can shape the narrative.

    • calibrator says:

      When I read something like this I nearly always suspect that somebody is not only trying to grab a higher market share but is preparing for some M&A battle…

      We may only find out years later if we shaped something or if other tactics were in place.

  6. HomeRemedySupply says:

    Fluoride – Another potential positive message tied to the Super Bowl, if we share it.

    Tom Brady
    The Super Bowl game was Sunday, February 3, 2019.
    The New England Patriots defeated the Los Angeles Rams 13-3 to become the champions of Super Bowl LIII.

    Patriots quarterback Tom Brady secured the sixth championship ring of his career, giving Boston its second major league championship in less than six months.
    Due to his numerous accomplishments, records, and accolades, most analysts and sportswriters consider Brady to be the greatest quarterback in NFL history.

    Tom Brady opposes water fluoridation and wants people to protect their health.
    Read more here https://www.dogsagainstfluoridation.com/news-activism

    Tom Brady quote:
    “Whenever the media claims any of the dietary methods that I pursue are new age or even quackery, I tell them that some of the biggest advertisers on television and in the stadiums I played in are marketing all the wrong things.”

  7. manbearpig says:

    When I watched this video early this morning, I was half-comatose. So I decided to give it a rewatch (now that I’m half-falling asleep)

    and it struck me that the voice in the Washington Post “ad” intoning the slogans:

    “Because Knowing empowers us. Because Knowing helps us decide.”

    sounded strangely similar to Tom Hanks’ voice in The Circle when he says:

    “Because Knowing is Good. But Knowing Everything, is Better.”

    and in that same add, another dose of “When our nation is at risk” accompanied by the blown out building, laying still another layer on the official conspiracy theory narrative, with such feeling, that it would be uncouth to question its veracity…

    And there was that comment in the SilviaTerra ad at the beginning “We have the forests that we have today, We can’t change that”

    reinforcing this ambient Guilt about the state of our planet – (“This is Your Fault, the least you can do is Support our awesome technocratic Solution”)

    reinforcing the illusion of how small the Earth is and the illusion of how powerful and huge we are

    to reinforce the Man-made Climate change BS,

    as if Man were big enough to change, even ruin, such infinitely old and colossal systems…ignoring, blocking out the vast, vast spaces filled with nothing but Forests and other untouched expanses of nature! We occupy Maximum 10% of the planets land masses and that’s including our crops and industries and all the rest of it…

    As hinted at by Mr Corbett, there is a constant subliminal conversation going on between human beings and their “keepers” via ads and entertainment, memes and polemics that has very little to do with the pretexts offered for their existence; the product, the cause, the plot line etc…

    and everything to do with indoctrination, formatting a mindset, cemented through pavlovian conditioning of emotions…

    oh and I finally picked up on Mr West’s “the Superb Owl” thingy Bohemian Grove style I presume Yowza! 😯

  8. Fawlty Towers says:

    Anybody else catch the irony from the “best” ad, saved for last by Broc?
    Washington Post hitting us with one fake news story after another in an attempt to show us why their news matters! 🙂

  9. HomeRemedySupply says:

    I apologize in advance. I just don’t know where to post this recent article…
    Exclusive: Facebook ex-security chief: How ‘hypertargeting’ threatens democracy
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/facebook-security-officer-alex-stamos-targeting-risk-142859539.html

    It is a long-ass article, but the more you read the more insight that is gained into the corporate world and internet security.
    The article is not really about just Facebook, but covers ground where Alex Stamos has tread.
    I’m not saying everything in the article is gospel, but one can read between the lines.

    Some keywords or topics or…
    Yahoo, Facebook, NSA, trolls, social media, Russian hackers, more hackers, white hats and black hats, Chinese hackers, DNC, GRU, Cambridge Analytica, Microsoft, Google, Tesla, NBC, Russian FSB, child sexual abuse rings, fraud, kidnappings,….

    Tidbit EXCERPTS…
    A “warrant canary” is an indirect, wink-wink way that an ISP can signal to users that the FBI has obtained a court-order to surveil their accounts, though the order forbids directly alerting the user.

    By his senior year of high school, Stamos’s skills were drawing attention. He received an unsolicited letter from the National Security Agency… …was offering him a full college scholarship in exchange for a ROTC-like commitment to work for it afterward. “Which is really creepy,” he says, “because you have no idea how they found you.”

    Jeff Moss, a/k/a The Dark Tangent, had launched the first DEF CON conference in 1993, with about 100 people in attendance, Moss estimates. As a gauge of how the community has grown, the most recent one, in 2018, drew 28,000… …Though Moss sold Black Hat in 2005, he still runs DEF CON. He also holds other positions, which hint at how important these conferences turned out to be. Now 44, Moss serves on the Council on Foreign Relations, the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council, and the U.S. Homeland Security Advisory Council.

    …he delivered a talk at DEF CON 21, entitled “The White Hat’s Dilemma.” In it he talked about the Hippocratic Oath that doctors began adhering to more than 2,000 years ago… …We are the technological priesthood of the 21st century, or perhaps of the third millennium. Everyone here has fixed their family’s computers,” he noted in his talk. “Every time you do that, it reminds you of the incredible complexity of the world that underlies our day-to-day activities and that the majority of people do not understand. And we do. Maybe that gives us moral obligations just like doctors have always had.”

    • calibrator says:

      > By his senior year of high school, Stamos’s skills were drawing attention. He received an unsolicited letter from the National Security Agency… …was offering him a full college scholarship in exchange for a ROTC-like commitment to work for it afterward. “Which is really creepy,” he says, “because you have no idea how they found you.”

      The problem is that the vast majority of people still think that schools are places kids are being sent to to get knowledge stuffed into them somehow. Parents still think that the success solely depends on the intelligence and diligence of the kid, or, perhaps, a bit on the capabilities of the teachers.

      This may have been the case two hundred years ago.

      But the slogan that appeared in the Microsoft/SilviaTerra ad (“You can’t manage, what you can’t measure”) applies here, too:
      To “manage” the kids they have to be measured first – and this happens all the time and is in fact nothing new at all. Only the methods get modernized.

      When I was in elementary school (mid-70ies) the kids were divided by their reading skills: The better readers then became “cats” and kids that couldn’t became “dogs” (no joke). Really motivating, I guess.
      This was in the mid-70ies. Today this would be intolerable, of course.

      In fourth class kids were then selected for their future school path depending on their “learning successes”.
      All parents know this, of course, as they get recommendations which they then can follow or not – but they often don’t understand what this implies: A file (or database entry) for each kid. Very likely data that will never get erased.
      Then the basic principle applies: If you have data, companies and/or institutions want access.
      If they don’t have access they will try to get it. We *here* know this.

      Later another buzzword came up: The “electronic classroom” (my translation from German, don’t know how other countries called it).
      This of course was marketed to better transport knowledge into the kids and make them better understand the future (technologies). The later part is certainly true but nobody mentioned that this works in two ways: Instead of having only the teacher to measure the kids, they then get measured automatically – all the time.

      Things like that are the foundation of a surveillance state.
      Your regular 19-year-old, even someone like Alex Stamos, usually doesn’t understand this. Now he does. Many adults will never understand it and the mainstream media will never stuff like that.

      > Jeff Moss, a/k/a The Dark Tangent, had launched the first DEF CON conference in 1993, with about 100 people in attendance, Moss estimates. As a gauge of how the community has grown, the most recent one, in 2018, drew 28,000… …Though Moss sold Black Hat in 2005, he still runs DEF CON. He also holds other positions, which hint at how important these conferences turned out to be. Now 44, Moss serves on the Council on Foreign Relations, the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council, and the U.S. Homeland Security Advisory Council.

      Sooner or later the vast majority of “rebels” will become “bourgeois”.
      The question remains: Was he really a rebel or was the first DEF CON already compromised?
      But what do I know – Tulsi Gabbard is also a member of the CFR…

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        Tulsi Gabbard is also a member of the CFR
        I did not know that.
        She is known for her “anti-war with Syria” message.

        Not long ago, Joe Rogan interviewed an illiterate, prowar NY Times reporter, Bari Weiss. Weiss denigrated Tulsi. Rogan politely called her out on the diss. Then Jimmy Dore went after Weiss, making her look like applesauce.

        I like people standing up against the war machine.

        Joe Rogan has had some recent headlines as far as the alternative media goes.
        He had the CEO of Twitter on. Many folks felt he did not ask tough enough questions. Rogan later addressed their concerns in a monologue. Rogan also addressed Alex Jones.

        I like Rogan’s style. He is articulate, with no real pre-set agenda. He is just someone conversing with someone else in a civil manner.
        Interest – His “interested in things and people” factor is refreshing.
        I think he draws a wide audience base, often younger. Mixed Martial Arts NFC Fight enthusiasts probably tune into him often.

        • calibrator says:

          The CFR admits this little known fact on their own membership roster (the very first entry under “G”):
          https://www.cfr.org/membership-roster-g-k

          But all American candidates from “team red” or “team blue” have to be “approved”. In the end the worst one that is able to get a majority is chosen and the others will express their support. The DNC will see to that and Gabbard will be no exception.

          If Gabbard is chosen (not entirely unfeasible) then she will simply not deliver what she promises, but probably doing the opposite. Just like Trump continues to pump “fresh” sludge into the swamp (Bolton, Abrams…).

          I’ve also seen the Rogan-Weiss “sketch”.

          Rogan is no journalist, but simply a non-crazy showboat compared to Alex Jones. He is quickly establishing himself as a brand and that is always suspicious.
          Dore serves the “progressive but still democrat” end of the pundit spectrum. He may explain more and dig deeper than other pundits but his objectivity ends when somewhat progressive candidates show up.

          Bashing an incompetent NYT employee is no contradiction but a confirmation, given the globalist agenda of the NYT and its integration into this establishment since their support of Grover Cleveland in 1884. The NYT is the mortal enemy of systemic change and this won’t change as long as the Sulzberger family is in control.

          Weiss however is the worst kind, though: She comes across as a naive and ignorant kid, only parrotting opinions – good luck America with this kind of “4th power”!

          But as a German I can’t complain: German “journalist” Claas Relotius is one of the worst cases of press manipulation ever.

          You know, the “Hitler diaries” were probably the worst case but at least done for profit only – with no practical political outcome, except demonstrating that most of the so-called “historians” are frauds.
          The “diaries” were also debunked pretty quickly but Relotius was active for several years without anybody really taking offense.
          On the contrary: Even CNN (not because of their “quality”, but because of the international significance) awarded him journalism prizes.

          But because of Relotius and the statement of another editor the awoken people in Germany now call this kind of journalists “Haltungsjournalisten” (“stance or attitude journalists”):
          It’s more important for them to have the “right” stance on things and deliver the articles in exactly the right way than being objective and discover where the facts lead them.

          Even if Weiss isn’t telling the truth, she is omitting facts that prevent giving the reader a complete picture of a person/event/whatever.

          She has her job because she has the “right attitude”.
          And of course this is no conspiracy – she instinctively (and apparently not intellectually) recognizes what is “important”.

          • manbearpig says:

            yup. relotius is a journalist of his time as is weiss…

            convinced that they wouldn’t recognize facts if they tripped over them

            people are no longer interested in them.

            They’re interested in feelings.

            journalism is now about taking the stance that feels best.

            it feels good to elect a messiah ressembling mlk. It feels good to “protect the planet”. It feels good to despise Trump. it feels good to give money to the cia via concert-promoted ngos.

            it feels good to have the right attitude. and it feels great to hate folks who don’t.

            and that was my micro translation break rant

            • calibrator says:

              > They’re interested in feelings.

              The motto of the magazine “Der Spiegel” is “Sagen, was ist.” (= “Say it how it is.”) and they put it in silvery letters on the wall of their headquarters.

              The credo of Relotius et al however is “Feel what should be”.

              It’s not entirely incompetence but rather some kind of religion.

              They really think that they are right and they have the right to invent people, places and events as go along.
              The end justifies the means, doesn’t it, eh?

              They don’t write articles, they write commandments.

              > it feels good to have the right attitude. and it feels great to hate folks who don’t.

              You just summed up perfectly what ANTIFA is (re)all(y) about.

          • HomeRemedySupply says:

            I chuckled at Just like Trump continues to pump “fresh” sludge into the swamp (Bolton, Abrams…).

            In Texas, I guess “Haltungsjournalisten” might be pronounced “Halt tongues of journalists…and”.

            calibrator, I often enjoy reading your comments at Corbett Report.

            A couple of my younger brothers are Lutheran ministers. One went to a college in Germany and so had to learn German. Then, in Germany, he had to learn Greek. I told him he was a masochist.

            Actually, our American grandparents of the early 1900’s spoke an Americanized low German. But us 5 grandsons, nor our parents, never learned it.
            All my brothers enjoy their beer, some a little too much at times. I guess this is a German trait. Our Father would pass the Schlitz beer can around to all 5 boys at the large dinner table until it wound up with the youngest in the high chair.

            • calibrator says:

              > calibrator, I often enjoy reading your comments at Corbett Report.

              Thanks – I can only return that compliment!

              > All my brothers enjoy their beer, some a little too much at times. I guess this is a German trait.

              Beer is often not seen as booze in Germany but as “basic food” – that is true.
              It’s also likely healthier than most beverages but I prefer to destroy myself with American soft drinks. 😉

          • generalbottlewasher says:

            There is a direct correlation between the creation of the secret elite and advertising today. I can only encourage every one who commented here to read Docherty and Macgregor books. The Hidden History.. WW1…chapters 1,2&3
            show some interesting uses of the power of propeganda, the use of programming the populace, and planting Trojan Horses well ahead of times in strategic locations for future use. I found it mirrors this entire page of conversation in many ways. Where was the sinister born that we have to tolerate today? They make a pretty good case. One that I can say blew me away was revealed in chapter 2. The relationship between Sir Alfred Milner and Jans Smuts . Probably as equal to and well thought out in detail as Tulsi Gabbard and all that was discussed above and below. Do we have the flogging of Chinese workers? Do we have concentration camps for woman and children? Yes we do.

            • calibrator says:

              Hi!
              Can you elaborate on the Jan Smuts – Milner relationship, please?
              Perhaps one to three sentences so that I can see what it is about.

              • generalbottlewasher says:

                Calibrator, No way in a few sentences! But will make it short. 5 sentences.
                As per Docherty and Macgregor. Smutts,
                once Rhodes close friend and confidant, allegedly defected to the the Boars and was quickly promoted to the position of advisor to Kruger. Strangely, both he and Milner wanted exactly the same outcome, war.
                Smutts had a road to Damascus change from angalophile to angaliphobe. Kruger made him States Attorney. He agitated the Uitlanders mercilesly with taxes, fines and fees and unshackled Fitzpatrick, a party to the Jamison raid, of his political parole to greater agitate the populace. He couldn’t have served Milners wishes better while undermining Krugers attempts to quiet the unrest. Was he a Trojan horse secret agent? The authors believe so for Milner was running out of time to get the war started before the liberals returned to power in England. The Oxford trained lawyer Smutts couldn’t have served Milner better from the inside of the Boar camp to achieve the secret elites objectives. Smutts thwarted Kitchners offers of peace making Britains victory complete.
                They learned a lot of tricks and methods that are blue prints of the NWO of today. The two books by Macgregor and Docherty fills in what Carroll Quigley left vague about the secret elites role in modern history.

              • calibrator says:

                Thank you! Much appreciated – I think I get the gist of it.
                The “man inside” is a staple now, it seems.
                Just look at what Microsoft did with Nokia back in the day. Stephen Elop literally imploded the company from the inside.
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Elop

                I think I will have to plunk down for the D&M works (there actually is a German edition out now but I’d rather read the original text).

        • HomeRemedySupply says:

          Here is the Joe Rogan podcast that I listened to. (I don’t listen to all his stuff.) I also listened to his message to/about Alex Jones’ response to Dorsey.
          For me, it gave me a better understanding of Joe’s demeanor.
          (21 minutes)
          Joe Rogan Apologizes for Jack Dorsey Podcast
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE8SygTC_NQ

  10. cherub says:

    It would be nice if you would cover Parkland.

    It is in the news yet AGAIN… and you still ignore it.

    https://www.mail.com/news/us/8996208-family-healing-1-son-slain-wounded-parkland.html#.23140-stage-hero1-9

    Funny thing, if you try to post any of the links below on a gun forum, you know, the sorta place where people would be real interested in false flags being used to take their guns… the thread gets shut down or deleted almost immediately. I think most of the gun forums out there are just being used to control the flow of information which guides the conversation on guns.

    Anyway, here’s the real story on it.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/XmMoxsDhV5xU/

    https://www.brighteon.com/5855026776001

    https://www.minds.com/eoreor

    • calibrator says:

      > I think most of the gun forums out there are just being used to control the flow of information which guides the conversation on guns.

      In Germany every website has to have an “impressum” similar to a newspaper or magazine. Of course they also try to veil things but you have at least a name of a person or company you can follow. Often enough this leads somewhere.

      In the “American” part of the internet you simply can’t see who operates a forum. The “about” page if often completely worthless.
      It’s entirely possible that a forum is operated by some government agency – either as a honeypot or to control the readership.
      I think this is relatively likely as “full spectrum dominance” also means control of the millions of weapons in private hands…

  11. cherub says:

    It would be nice if you would cover Parkland.

    It is in the news yet AGAIN… and you still ignore it.

    see family-healing-1-son-slain-wounded-parkland on mail.com

    Funny thing, if you try to post any of the links below on a gun forum, you know, the sorta place where people would be real interested in false flags being used to take their guns… the thread gets shut down or deleted almost immediately. I think most of the gun forums out there are just being used to control the flow of information which guides the conversation on guns.

    Anyway, here’s the real story on it.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/XmMoxsDhV5xU/

  12. cherub says:

    Is there any good reason that a minds account would have 6 open sessions on it, as in 6 logged in users?

  13. cherub says:

    I quote from mail.com article “Parkland anniversary highlights Democratic shift on guns”

    “In the final weeks before the 2008 election, Barack Obama’s campaign sent mailers to Florida voters reassuring them that he supported the Second Amendment. In the opening days of the 2020 Democratic primary, it’s hard to imagine any candidate feeling the need to make a similar gesture.”

    So, I am left wondering, why do none of the “legit” alternative news sites cover this?

    I made a video that shows many very important things, the most important being that 1) The closet video was recorded a 9:32, 5 hours before the shooting (this on top of the fact kids like Hogg and Gonzales have connections to CNN and the acting industry respectively) 2) Hogg couldn’t even remember where he was when the shooting started. In one vid he says he was at home and had to cycle to school, and the other he says he was in class. 3) That there were many different descriptions of the shooter indicating more than 1 shooter 4) that 2 people clearly, unmistakably noted more than 1 shooter.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/XmMoxsDhV5xU/

    Is Corbett ever gonna get off his butt and cover this? Why the silence on this one event? From all of the legit alt media?

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Back to Top