Interview 1307 – James Corbett on Fault Lines

10/16/201716 Comments

Today James joins Garland Nixon and Lee Stranahan of Sputnik Radio’s Fault Lines to discuss the rise of independent online media and the decline of the dinosaur media paradigm.

SHOW NOTES:
The Kuwaiti Incubator Babies – LIE

ICC Propaganda about Libyan viagra rape

5 People You Won’t Believe Worked For the CIA

How the CIA Plants News Stories in the Media

Jeff Bezos Is Doing Huge Business with the CIA, While Keeping His Washington Post Readers in the Dark

Washington Post Finally Breaks ‘Bilderberg’ Silence After Decades of Censorship

Episode 265 – The Myth of Journalistic Objectivity

A Q&A On “Objective” Journalism

What I Learned From the “PropOrNot” Propaganda List

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  1. wingsuitfreak says:

    I always hear that Incubator story, but I never actually saw it when it first aired. I was in Panama (FTArmy), and then went over there. I know, silly statist. I can tell you that my experience and the media show I saw years later in various YouTube videos were completely different wars. I know, I should have given a warning first. I’m sure most of you are shocked and possibly having coronaries. Nice interview, you certainly won’t ever hear this topic being discussed on the tv.

    P.S. First! 🙂

  2. manbearpig says:

    I love the little kittens peeking out of the christmas stockings on Nurse Nayirah’s white “pajama sweat shirt”, the communion-like necklace, the chaste pearl earrings and modest braid enhancing the tearful average American tenth-grader persona…

    very complimentary to Wag the Dog’s blond “Albanian” teen-ager clutching her white cat and dodging digital bombs and burning buildings on a bridge…

    to the blare of “oohaah oohaah Anne Frank sirens” evoking a famous terrified and terribly tragic-tale teen-ager who should have been saved by America…

    the pre-pubescent girl under the genuine rain bestowing festive wheat upon the president in exchange for his magnanimous and protective trench coat…

    the pretty post-pubescent young woman tearfully swaying to the country version of “Courage Mom”…

    and the 1966 T-O-R-T-U-R-E message painstakingly blinked out in morse code live on TV by POW Jeremiah Denton from North Vietnam…

    and Woody Harrelson’s William Schuman sweatshirt torn in morse to read “Courage Mom”…

    like the left-behind “Lara Croftian” Jessica Lynch legend…

    all to save a (Lewinskian) teen-age girl’s honour sullied in the oval office…

    fabricated reality produced and projected through the hall of mirrors and looking glasses of cameras and cell phones, televisions and recording studio control rooms, through shoe-throwing (think sitting duck and ducking Bushes) Fuck-Albania t-shirts, loyal dogs, the old-shoe blues and Hollywood hypnosis…

    Good for communication students to study the power of symbols…

    …so that someday they can go to work for Hill and Knowlton and produce 10-million dollar war propaganda for and featuring Royal families…

    • wingsuitfreak says:

      Hola ManBearPig and inventor of the internet and global warming! When I read your comment about the power of symbols, it reminded me of an incident that I saw in Desert Storm.
      We were supposed to be going out to raid an Iraqi outpost. While we were loading up in our trucks, a chaplain (catholic) was coming by and blessing the troops. Having been raised baptist, though of no religious belief, I was fascinated by the power of his arm waving and mutterings. Though I doubt any of the soldiers were truly devout (if they were followers of a loving god, then why were they professional killers?), these gestures calmed their fears. I have never understood this, as I am a believer in rational thought, but I have always been impressed as to how otherwise reasonable people could allow themselves to be controlled by someone else just waving their arms and saying that god would protect them in their holy mission to murder their fellow men. Such a strange world we live in.

      • manbearpig says:

        Que tal wingsuitfreak and instigator of my new moniker!

        Maybe hystrionic gestures of religious faith are comforting because

        deep down we know god and eternity exists.

        We just haven’t figured out exactly what it is yet…

        or perhaps humans are just profoundly pragmatic and take comfort where they can find it…

        btw, rational thought can get you into a lot of trouble and can even cause and/or exacerbate cancer and alcoholism. And sometimes its just plain illusory.

        now I gotta get back to social engineering, creating the new world order and transhumanist augmenting brain chips…so see ya ’round the campus… as one truly rational guy used to say…

        • wingsuitfreak says:

          Oh yes, while I don’t believe in religion, I do believe in God. I just think religion is for man, not any god. It’s true that rationality has its’ limitations, and beyond it lies the realm of compassion and imagination, but for the main; I think it works just fine. By the way, great job on your New World Order! JimBob

      • Richard Ran says:

        Hi wingsuitfreak,

        From your story I gather (might be wrong, you could have been just an observer or journalist, the way you describe the situation) that you were there as a soldier yourself. Is that right?

        So I must assume that you belonged to the group that you described as professional killers, even murderers. Quite rightly, you question the sincerity of the religious beliefs of those who’d go out on a holy mission to possibly murder some fellow men.
        And then you went with them to do the very same, if I’m not mistaken? Perhaps or probably without your nerves having been calmed by that priest?

        So how about you? Was it your belief in rational thought that proved insufficient in preventing you to become or at least to behave as a professional killer? For the same question logically applies to you, and perhaps even more so, because one can argue that you weren’t influenced by the religious control that was used to sanction possible killings:

        If you were a believer in rational thought, then why were you a professional killer?

        I’m seriously interested.

        Cheers,
        Richard

        • wingsuitfreak says:

          Having grown up in the southern US, I had been brainwashed by our culture into believing in the old honor in war mentality. I grew out of it. Was I calmed? No. At that time, I was recently divorced from a hellish marriage and dying seemed okay to me. Not to mention I was a statist. A true believer. That was already going bye-bye by that time, but not all the way yet. Would I still murder my fellow man? Only in the manner acceptable to the non-aggression principle. The only flag I respect anymore is the Pirate flag. At least the pirates weren’t lying.

    • manbearpig says:

      Actually none of the action in Wag the Dog was meant to save the abused “firefly girl’s” honour (as if such a thing could be done) but to get her agressor reelected of course… (hate when I spit out comments like that)
      anyhow…important nuance…

      • manbearpig says:

        …one of the deliberate ironies in Wag the Dog, of course being that they repeatedly wield the emotionally-charged symbol of the “young girl” to make people forget that a young girl was abused in the oval office…this fictional molestation being (deliberately?) mirrored by the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal that broke just after the movie’s release… further emulated by the large photo of the firefly girl in the movie wearing the same hat Lewinsky wore in photo with her embracing Clinton (have to scroll down):

        http://teakdoor.com/the-teakdoor-lounge/141413-monica-lewinsky-opens-up-bill-clinton.html

        now back to babies in incubators, iraqi soldiers and royal liars…

        • manbearpig says:

          speaking of wielding the vulnerable woman symbol to political ends:

          IMF’s Lagarde says it’s time to get serious about digital currency

          “She pointed to distributed ledger technology like blockchain that can help make the banking system more inclusive.

          “I think of women in some of the developing countries that have to carry cash around who are at risk of violence and all the rest of it,” she said. “If they can use their cell phone and operate in a much more discreet and efficient way, it would be terrific.””

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