Episode 341 – Welcome to Your Driverless Future!

07/18/201882 Comments

We’ve all seen the propaganda by now: Like it or not, autonomous driving technology is on the way. But what will that future look like? Should we be concerned about the lack of control implicit in these technologies? How vulnerable they are to hackers, both criminal and deep state? Or the fact that our entire society is about to be re-engineered before our very eyes? Join James for this thought-provoking episode of The Corbett Report as he explores the road ahead on the path to the driverless future.

For those with limited bandwidth, CLICK HERE to download a smaller, lower file size version of this episode.

For those interested in audio quality, CLICK HERE for the highest-quality version of this episode (WARNING: very large download).

SHOW NOTES:
Future Film | Peter Returns | Kia

Woman dies after being hit by self-driving Uber

WSJ Tech News Briefing Humans in the loop?

Crashes of Convenience: Michael Hastings

Richard Clarke: Car Hacking Possible In Crash That Killed Michael Hastings

DARPA Talks about hacking cars

Autonomous driving levels 0 to 5: Understanding the differences

EconTalk.org

EconTalk: Benedict Evans on the Future of Cars

Radiolab – Driverless Dilemma

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  1. mkey says:

    Even more time for zombies to waste on their phones, fantastic.

    • pearl says:

      That’s what I was thinking. How many screens are in those traps anyway?

      It’s getting hard for me to be optimistic about the future where every choice will become a line in the sand.

  2. shanbos says:

    driverless car is just another example of the utter stupidity of the idiots running the show! can you imagine one trying to navigate a Canadian winter storm. Sorry this is all another “global warming” stupidity episode

    • shanbos says:

      Gee’s, just reading my own comment I think I better clarify the statement “Sorry this is all another “global warming” stupidity episode” – What I meant is the whole concept of driverless car is as stupid an idea as the idea of “there is global warming and people are the cause of it”. I WAS NOT referring to “episode 341” as being stupid

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        I tracked with your original meaning.
        Funny…just this morning, the weather channel had a story about how folks will lose the internet from sea levels rising.

        Dang! It is another hot, humid summer in Texas. 105F all this week. Often, I am out in the sun all day, grunting lifting things. I go through sometimes 6 sweat soaked T-shirts a day. But I still laugh at the global warming hoax.

        • VoiceOfArabi says:

          Hello HomeRemedySupply,

          You LUCKY person… only 105F…..

          I was out walking (unusual) at around 11:00am and it was 115F with 78% humidity…

          What I would give for a 105F

          All the best and keep drinking water.. 🙂

          • HomeRemedySupply says:

            Wow! What high humidity with the temperature. That will really make a person sweat.

            • I Shot Santa says:

              Try Fluorida. Or Panama. The temps are lower in Fl. but the humidity is killer. You’ll start sweating around 80 degrees. Though it’s usually only in the low to mid 90s. I remember driving in Dallas in 98 when they had that whole 90 days over a hundred days and my block in my toyota van was cracked (right under the driver’s seat) and I was carrying gallons of water to put in the radiator on the way. My suit would be soaked by the time I got through with the LBJ! JimBob who don’t miss suits and ties at all. Also, just as an aside, for all you occultists out there; Mars is close on the 27th of July. The Media Monarchy link I posted mentioned it and the whole NSA anon (oops! I meant Q) mentioned this month. Just trying to think like a warlock even though all I have are long locks.

              Also this interview is also demonizing the Putin meeting. Bringing up the “poisoning” in the UK by the Russians:

              https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoswYMTz68KlHKn3oEzTm4A

            • VoiceOfArabi says:

              Hello HomeRemedySupply,

              Yes.. I feel really sorry for people who wear glasses, as it instantly fogs when walking from the inside (as everything is air conditioned), into the outside, even when you walk to your car.

              Also, Sunglasses, camera’s, mobile phones, etc etc

  3. mkey says:

    There’s many layers this this onion, indeed. I liked how, in the closing of the radiolab podcast, they just kind of swept the issue under the rug. After all, it’s countless lives saved against a small, insignificant even, number of victims that needed not be.

    One sure has to think about the countless lives figure, it’s very interesting. Why are there so many lives lost on the roads? Could it all boil down to human error?

    Firstly, lets consider the “licensing process” and what’s acquired with it. Talking on grounds of first hand experience, in my neck of the woods the licensing is not much more but an expensive piece of paper stuffed in a plastic envelope. Not much knowledge is imparted, not many skills are obtained; the freedom to do legally what was previously considered illegal has been bestowed upon you and that’s basically it.

    Several limitations are imposed on fresh drivers, but I don’t know how effective these are. If some people fail to understand that other people’s reactions to your driving can’t be expected to be timed correctly when you’re doing 200km/h (or about 140mph) on local roads something isn’t right. Truth be told, much of the new drivers may have the proclivity to cause some minor damage, but most of them won’t be mowing anyone down.

    Secondly, what about the cars themselves? Why is the vast majority made such that safety isn’t a prime concern? Why are there wast lots all over the globe filled with brand new cars that will never sell? Why are cars with high powered engines made? Why does the internal combustion engine still use this decades old, as inefficient as it gets, technology? It feels like there’s a certain theme behind these question, I just can’t pin point it.

    Thirdly, lets talk about infrastructure. Crumbling bridges, slick-as-ice roads, pot holes up the wazoo. While the government is obviously the only entity allowed to build roads it’s obviously less apt at maintaining them, with tax collected for road maintenance being spent elsewhere.

    What else has in impact on number of crash related victims? Are there any other solutions to most of these issues besides a developed public transportation system?

  4. manbearpig says:

    This episode, just after the provocative P-tech throwback, could be entitled “The Backdoor Blues”…

    Biiiiiip! “If you have a question concerning your insurance policy please press one. If you would like to take out a policy or terminate a contract please press two. If you would like to modify a clause or report an incident please type three. Otherwise, to return to the reception menu, please type zero.”

    At the beginning, speaking about the woman who was mowed down into nothingness by a driverless Uber, the mention of her walking with her bike Outside the pedestrian lane

    made me think about one of the katrillion books I’ve started to avidly read and never finish called

    “The Simplified Man”

    that explores how people are simplifying themselves, their needs and mentality, in order to adapt to and fit into the squared-off binary code and boxes of modern technology that are managing increasingly invasive portions of their existence.

    So for a moment I thought the moral of the story would be that this negligent woman, who lightly ignored the painted yellow pedestrian lines designed to organize human existence, got what was coming to her as she dared to jeopordize everyone else’s immense pleasure of benefitting from the progress of driverless cars and that it was perfectly normal that everyone should have to modify their behaviour and fit strictly into the boxes, under penalty of unmourned death, to compensate for AI’s tyrannical lack of intuition. (genuine human error is infinitely more forgiveable, right?)

    Will living increasingly with and being ruled over by machines give us the compassion, imagination and psycho-spiritual needs of a machine? Will our profound tendencies of imitation transform us into pragmatically self-centered machines?

    On another note, the one and only Econtalk program I listened to about empathetical trends thanks to this site was indeed most thought-provoking…

  5. ktrammel says:

    As a programmer I can imagine the weight on the team that had to accept their code ended up leading to the death of a person. I believe the only way that driverless cars (and all automated solutions that entail autonomous movement) will work is when every potential obstacle broadcasts its own unique signal that locates and identifies it in time and space relative to the autonomous entity in question. That means there will be pressure to ensure that RFID tech is more fully implemented, including in the body or on the person. It goes without saying that other cars will (if they aren’t already) be mandated to broadcast their information to each other and to autonomous vehicles and robots. RFID (in some form) seems the best guarantee to avoid these unwanted consequences. This is undoubtedly something the programmers who face these ethical nightmares will be pushing for, possibly even as a condition of implementation of autonomous mobile tech. Although I wouldn’t actually do this myself because I don’t think driverless cars are safe at any speed, I can understand how programmers, who generally confine themselves to intellectual problem solving and let others deal with ethical issues, would push for that since one of the costs of not doing it is human beings getting killed by one’s software. I don’t think there’s any other way to avoid this technology running people over from time to time, or driving passengers into a building or tree occasionally. They wouldn’t impregnate every tree with an RFID tag (or every building) but they would likely apply some kind of special paint or radar sensitive objects or material to distinguish roads and lanes.

    • manbearpig says:

      The poor programmers yea, and the poor Programs! Have you for a fleeting instant considered how badly the artificial intelligence must feel about this regrettable incident of human termiantion!!? Just ask Madam bin Salman, aka Sophia!

      I utterly agree that smart cities and driverless cars have always been first and foremost pretexts for placing RFID and sensors et al absolutely everywhere reaching into the hithermost intimate and otherwise unreachable, obscure and far-reaching spaces, in the most sacred interests of security of course.

      Certainly traumatized programs and humans alike will come together to meet in the middle, each making sufficient sacrifices and compromises on either side to make this safe, harmonious and brave new world come true.

  6. I Shot Santa says:

    Once again, I’m off topic; but I just saw this video from Press for Truth about a new way to surf the net anonymously. I am not a techie so I have no idea if this makes any sense at all, but I know there are a lot of techies here. Anybody got a clue?:

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/ulDAF7RtW30/

    JimBob who will now finally watch this video already knowing he ain’t getting in no car that doesn’t have a human working the wheel. Even a fluoridian driver would be better than having HAL2000 running the show. I saw how that worked out!

  7. weilunion says:

    Good show James.

    And as the advent of the car itself, changed the geography and the economics of life, so will the advent of this new technology, with all its horrors.

    Psycho-geography is what many of us call the new configuration of life.

    As to economics being a reflection of our relationships, it is more.

    Dialectically it defines our relationships through not just use value, but exchange value and the moral underbelly of all of that.

    As long as the means of production is owned by a non-producing class, our relationships will be unconsciously and consciously controlled, honed and our psycho-geography will be structured.

    • I Shot Santa says:

      dear weilunion, You are certainly right when you note all the complexities of this, but I am confused by your statement that the means of production are owned by non-producers. After all, even though our concept of the car in American life was shaped by them, with a lot of government help, GM is owned by producers. They produce cars. So that statement confuses me.
      On the job situation; (and this is just my own inner thought monster going off) I am reminded of the buggy whip example for automobiles and the rise of automation. I am not talking about AI as I don’t believe a field which can’t even define what consciousness is could make anything conscious. I just call it automation. However, it is far more advanced than anything we’ve ever experienced. Just like everything else we encounter in our daily lives.
      So, as an entrepreneur minded person; I see the changes in the job situations as a wonderfully chaotic landscape which will provide me with tons of opportunities that I would never have had before. However, most people have had that spirit sucked out of them. They do not even understand they have the ability to become their own boss. They believe that one MUST work for someone else in order to make a living. I know, it’s crazy but what isn’t when it comes to what goes on in people’s heads. Especially mine!
      However, all of this automation will force us all to look at work differently. Now, a single person will be able to operate their own factory. Putting out their own products. 3D printers are an excellent, though not final, example of this. People think AI is going to displace workers, but since there is NOT going to be this intelligent computer in reality; it will simply make it easier for the creators (to borrow from the lovely mind of Ayn Rand) to create. I suspect that this is also going to force the revolution of education as well in order to prevent social unrest (more than the mobs that will already be there) so that critical thinking skills can be developed.
      I know that many think the powers that cower will stop this, but they have already failed at doing so. Homeschooling is on the rise thanks, in large part, to the government stupidity of making schools a gun range for deranged people.
      The subject is certainly far more complex than any one person could ever understand and will only be able to grasp in hindsight. As usual. However, I do think it is not the end all by the economic displacement. Regardless of the plans of the idiots who think they can control us. Having said that, I have no plans to get into a driver-less car. Ever. JimBob who doesn’t trust those cars any more than he does the Terminator.

    • Duck says:

      wellonion
      the idea of a producing class is outdated… the ‘producing class’ is mechanical and intellectual and the huge majority of humans serve less and less economic production needs and function mainly as consumers.
      That is in itself a problem for othe reasons since most people are naturally lazy and indolent and are psychologically unsuited to live in a world that they wont need to work in… Universal basic income will be a bigger killer then cancer.

  8. s.jamieson says:

    Walking down the street with self-driving cars passing by, let alone riding a bicycle with self-driving cars nearby just does not appeal to me at all. I operate by instinct and that works for me, but endless other people do not, though that doesn’t work for me. I’m getting a flying car and hoping that self-flying flying cars are not soon available. Have you seen the Black Fly drone-like car yet? So cool!

  9. zapped says:

    A driverless automobile crashed into a parked vehicle and a vehicle with a driver at the helm crashed into my parked truck whilst unattended in a parking lot. I would not have been any happier if it were crashed into by a driverless vehicle.
    A driverless vehicle is as stupid an idea as is a stupid person who does not pay attention while driving.
    “The great north west”is the bastion of highway collisions and for what ever reason it is unknown.

  10. Fawlty Towers says:

    I have a few thoughts to impart on this, driven by some of James’ comments in his video.

    First off, if any here have not seen the made-for-TV episode entitled ‘The Lone Gunman’ that was aired on March 4, 2001 I strongly urge you to watch it!
    In it you will find many precious gems. Here are just a couple: A remote-controlled airplane full of passengers heading straight for the WTC1 (North tower).
    A car taken over by remote control and ‘killing’ its passenger.

    My previous car (bought in the 90’s) emitted an annoying frequency that was hurting my head. I am sensitive to noise/EMF’s etc.
    I traced the sensation to my armrest!
    I lifted it off and dug a little deeper.

    I discovered a hard drive right there in the middle of my car, 25+ years ago! I said “No way!”. I unplugged the power cables leading to the drive and that was the end of that!

    When I traded in my car 10+ years later I re-plugged the power cables. 🙂

    When these autonomous vehicles start to become a reality don’t get your hopes up with respect to licenses and insurance!

    Passenger licenses will replace driver’s licenses.
    Passenger insurance will replace driver’s insurance.

    BTW, nice touch James re: the ‘Privacy Notice’ alert when submitting new comments!

    • Duck says:

      Fawlty Towers
      Back in the 90’s a hard drive was measured in MEGABYTES,,,, what useful data a hard drive could hold I have no idea… are you sure it wasnt a computer board or something?
      Did anything not work in the car after you unplugged it?

      • Fawlty Towers says:

        It was a hard drive.
        If something didn’t work (maybe air bags etc.) I wasn’t aware of it. All essential components (engine, brakes, steering etc.) worked.

        • Duck says:

          weird.. maybe it was for music?
          If you had a really expensive luxury car that might be a use for one but I’m not even sure when MP3 came in.
          I found articles on HDD’s in cars later on for music and navigation….but that was way later then the 90’s.
          honestly I’m gong to have to ask a pal who knows cars if he has any ideas.
          I’d have disconnected it too.

  11. Duck says:

    Interesting video, but I would say that it wasnt that roads cut us off from our previous freedom by limitng us to roads as people were always limited by such things… from easy paths to river routes to train tracks.
    In the novel Huck Finn didnt just walk in any direction and he couldnt take ‘any’ route…he was limited by the means availible. Everyone in the pre-car world traveled pretty much the same few routes that were easy and went where they wanted to go.
    Speaking of huck Finn Mark and infrastructure changing… Twain wrote (maybe in life on the missisipi???Cant recall..) that while river boat captains at one time were cock of the roost when it came to cargo they ended up semi-begging for a load when farmers had access to railways aswell.
    Perhaps the lesson is that we should hope for and push for a variety of competing transport systems lest we end up with one that acts as an internal passport,

    • danmanultra says:

      Good observations. I do believe roads and other pathways have always existed. Only the true trailblazers travel the off roads, and if they are good at it they create new paths for less courageous people to follow. Maybe a good metaphor in there somewhere…

  12. VoiceOfArabi says:

    Hello James,

    I really don’t get it.

    In 1764, the Spinning jenny was invented by James Hargreaves. Same kind of fears and emotions was running among the people then.

    It is just a piece of technology no different than the automatic bread slicer.

    It is not the piece of technology. It is who controls it.

    We cannot stop technology from advancing.. however, we can be the owners of this technology if we choose. But it means we have to confront and fight.

    What I learnt from being on the Corbett Report so far (seeing which topics are popular and what comments are said.. I learnt the following:

    People generally are not lazy… People are driven by fear, and nothing scares people more than CONFRONTATION.

    People Generally will do anything to avoid confrontation.

    • pearl says:

      “People generally are not lazy… People are driven by fear, and nothing scares people more than CONFRONTATION…People Generally will do anything to avoid confrontation.”

      I agree and it’s tragic. Some may have a very good reason, having learned early in life (“children should be seen, not heard”), that “confrontation” was an unsafe option. I’d rather die alone in the desert than hash it out with certain types.

      • VoiceOfArabi says:

        Hello Pearl,

        I hear you, and I too have instances when confrontation is something i avoid at all costs.. mine, upsetting kind people…

        Story goes like this… someone i know through a friend is trying to be friends with me, which is fine and we go out for coffees and stuff, but he is not in “the close friends” circle.

        I only travel with close friends (people i trust with my life).

        He is trying to join us in our upcoming travels, and I keep changing the dates because i am unable to tell him that i don’t want him to join us… That’s my weakness…

        • pearl says:

          “…mine, upsetting kind people…”

          Awww…poor guy. You said it yourself – he’s a kind person. What’ve you got to lose? Here’s an idea: set up for yourself a life-threatening situation, and see if he’s willing to save you. If not, well, there’s your answer. If he walks that extra mile for you, you’ve gained more riches that most only dream about.

          It’s a no-brainer! 😉

          • VoiceOfArabi says:

            Hahahaha… I wish…

            Sadly, I am an old man who runs his life on gut feel and instinct. I think my friend is one of the kindest people out there, but I don’t think he has what it takes.

            You never know.. he might surprise me one day, but until then, i learnt to trust my gut feel. (for me, Travelling puts the most stress on people, and really tests their metal.. )

            • pearl says:

              “Travelling puts the most stress on people, and really tests their metal,..”

              Who am I to tell you to go against what your gut’s telling you? But you have to admit, there are times when our feelings mislead us. I know a man who trusts his gut, and he doesn’t trust a single person (a demon-behind-every-bush type). It’s sad to see how his suspicious mind consumes him; he’s his own worst enemy.

              Unless you’re going to the Amazon or Antarctica, how bad can it be?

              • VoiceOfArabi says:

                I hear you… but it is not just trust issue.. it is the whole unwritten “guy code” for the lack of a better name.

                I trust everyone i meet, until they give me a reason not to trust them.

                But I only trust people unconditionally if we are put in a situation (has to be naturally), and our metal gets tested, and we come out good for the other guy (or girl).

                From that moment on.. it is “i trust you with my life!”.

                it is an old man thinking, and as they say, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks…

              • pearl says:

                Being a wise, old man, your system has obviously served you well. And if it ain’t broke…

                Don’t mind me. I’m just feeling sorry for the other guy, and sure as heck don’t envy the eventual confrontation you must have. But you are a kind person yourself, and I trust you’ll go easy on him.

  13. VoiceOfArabi says:

    Challenge for James,

    Hello James, I enjoy the work you produce and that is why I am a member, and I truly enjoy my time on Corbett Report every day (if I can).

    You say in this video.. Here at Corbett, we go deeper

    Let us test that….

    I feel there are some topics you shy away from… Especially the topics that will ruffle people’s feathers.

    I genuinely don’t believe people are lazy (generally).. I think people are fearful and are driven by fear more than laziness.

    You can see this by the response to topics, and the comments given.

    It will be interesting if you could do a video report on your members, in term of what topics they interact with, what topics they read and choose not to comment on, what topics get popular and what topics are just to stay away from for this crowd.

    You know, general analytical on your community… Are you up for the challenge?

    • Duck says:

      VOA
      people are naturally lazy for a very good reason…wild people running off energy for no reason will die…thats why excercise is so hard f0r so many people- in the modern world people never had to learn to overcome that natural ‘govenor’ in their brain that tells them something is hard.
      Your right that they fear conflict… but its more that they fear being kicked out of the group because back when we were wild being kicked out or not helped by the group meant death 9 times out of 10

      • VoiceOfArabi says:

        Hello Duck,

        I agree with you partly…

        People don’t “waste” energy for no reason…

        People all have “drive”, some to create reports, some to create art, some to create science, etc etc.. This will over ride any laziness (otherwise called “your calling in life”)

        There are people who wish to “Do Nothing At All”… they are rare, and normally have bigger mental issues to deal with.

        So.. the term “People are lazy” is incorrect.

        I generally agree with you that people don’t want to be kicked out of groups (can you please explain this to our friends the Anarchists).. However, there are people who don’t belong to any group, and yet they are driven by fear of conflict, and they will say anything to avoid it.

        • Duck says:

          hi Voa
          ” …I generally agree with you that people don’t want to be kicked out of groups (can you please explain this to our friends the Anarchists)..”
          Tom Paine I think pointed out that one guy in the wilderness is at huge risk from any little injury…humans have never been able to live outside of some social organization- the most important and lowest level being THE FAMILY.
          Anarchy as an idea is nice but IMO in practice as unlikely to ever happen (in a pure form) as communism because (like communism) it goes against a deep laid set of behaviors that humans needed to stay alive for most of our existence.
          That said we’re now
          a) all so potentially rich that we can be much more inderpendant and
          b)all potentially so educated that we can know how to use and keep that freedom

          “…However, there are people who don’t belong to any group, and yet they are driven by fear of conflict, and they will say anything to avoid it…”
          Spineless people will never be free anyway… freedom is a learned and cultivated state not a natural state whatever myth makers might like to say… the ‘noble savage’ is a huge BS story as invented as wicca

          • VoiceOfArabi says:

            Hello Duck,

            I find myself agreeing with many of the point you make.

            I am not familiar with “noble savage”, but had a quick view on google.

            I strongly believe that majority of human moral code comes built into our DNA. “Do No Evil” is inside us in one form or another, regardless of religion or social teaching..

            (even when monkeys steel, they know they are doing something wrong and try to run away or hide etc)

            off course.. we are not all the same.. it is all varying degrees.

          • I Shot Santa says:

            Duck, anarchy is not a person outside of a group. Lone wolfing it without support. Perhaps you should pay a bit better attention to the community message that James is always hammering. THAT is anarchy. JimBob who IS lone wolfing it, but that’s just him.

  14. Nevertheless says:

    Self driving is about one thing, reducing employment. Globalist Zionist Jewish activities are wide spread on the internet, developing businesses that allow a few people to do what many have done before. Rocket Mortgage, Red Fin, Uber was just a stepping stone this removing drivers from the equation. Illegal workers are another, the destruction of unions. Of course there is the also ubiquitous sites like Angie’s List which has workers/companies sign up to a VETTING SYSTEM that is a gate keeper to the population. What is the criteria Angie’s List uses, maybe a company that supports the DBS movement might not get in, of course that reason would not be given. To be sure workers are under attack, I find almost always a Zionist Jewish owner behind these insidious companies who care little for the US workers, far more focused on profits and the destruction of western societies are they…

  15. HomeRemedySupply says:

    I always am impressed by how Corbett evolves the topic into deeper thoughts. I had never given much thought to the social and economic ramifications of “driverless cars”.

    Some of us here are old codgers.
    We have seen how the trends of society and economics change.

    I remember some of the “major” highways in the 1950’s, as I watched the Burma Shave signs go by. Relatively narrow blacktop roads (about the width of a neighborhood street), with either no shoulder or a gravel shoulder. Everyone was driving 70 mph plus with no seat belts and no A/C. Many roads were just gravel, or caliche clay that gooped up when wet.

    People shopped at downtown where all the independently owned stores were. Walmart wasn’t around yet. Cash registers were mechanical, not electric. Even in the early 60’s I remember buying some clothes at a downtown store. The clerk wrote an invoice, took my money, then placed them in a spring loaded tube shooting it across the store to another clerk who took the cash, made change, then sent the tube back across the store.

    ~~~~~
    A silly innovation with SUV’s and Vans these past few years: The automatic rear door liftgate. Literally, I have seen hundreds of people wrestle with trying to get it to open. And then it opens very, very slowly. People tell me they have to adjust it so it doesn’t hit the garage ceiling. Most folks wish it was just a manual door, pull the latch and open the door.

    • I Shot Santa says:

      I remember those tubes from the Navy! They were still using them some in the 80s. Also, I remember the cash registers were usually just cigar boxes. And the blacktop country roads with no lines or lights. And when I say no lights, I mean your car barely lit up the road in front of you. Black cows and mules have killed many a person at night. My dad told me the mule was the worst because of the way it would hit the windshield. JimBob whose neighbor used a mule to plow his little five acres or so of land.

      • HomeRemedySupply says:

        A mule to plow. Dang! That took some work.

        • I Shot Santa says:

          Not to mention an extensive vocabulary of swear words! When a mule doesn’t want to work, then your work has only just begun. JimBob who sort of feels for the mule in that case as plowing is hard work. I used to use a hand plow when the handles just reached my head.

  16. Nevertheless says:

    Convenience seems to be one of the tools of manipulation. In so many parts of the “Deep State” (people say deep state, or globalists, neocon/neo liberals, all are just code for Zionist Jews) they use convenience as a tool to get us to hand over privacy, control, independence. From businesses that don’t take cash, or “Nest” systems that regulate house temp or Amazon and it’s in house ordering system…everything is about so called convenience, but what we are really giving up in control and privacy, exactly what the globalists desire. BTW Trump is 100% globalist Zionist puppet, a carefully crafted product is he, all to foment division and distract from the true evil that is going on. The media does not hate Trump, they are just part of the dance of distraction.

    • Duck says:

      “…Convenience seems to be one of the tools of manipulation….”
      It is…but in the free market people can still starve the beast… the sad thing is that its easier to get people mad about starwars sucking then their phone and PC spying on them
      “..The media does not hate Trump, they are just part of the dance of distraction….” True…but consider the good news that the folks in charge felt the need to offer such a distraction… given their druthers they’d have kept offering the same old same old.
      TRump is a sign that the old order is shaky and at risk of being disrupted- kust like internet clampdowns are a sign that info is getting thru…. is that good or not?
      The time of instability is when people can change things to their liking… which people make that change is dependent on who cares most and wants it more IMO

  17. HomeRemedySupply says:

    The Magic Wand Mindset

    I feel like there is nothing wrong with trying to put forth less effort when performing a task. I mean…who wants to hand dig fence-post-holes when an auger could whip them out quickly.

    However, there can be a liability associated with focusing entirely on “putting forth less effort”… A weakness. Less self reliance. Less ability. Less ability to face up to problems and situations.

    Sometimes I think that corporations and governments create this Harry Potter ‘wave the magic wand’ image. Just like the Disney ads where the kid waves a wand, says some mumbo jumbo phrase, and effortlessly a “solution” appears.

    We all could probably think of many examples of this effortless mindset…such as…
    ~~ With only two thumbs, the “answer” lies there on the phone. Just slide the screen. “Whoosh! Wa’la Viola!”. My question is answered, my bill paid, my product on the way.
    ~~ “I have unwanted emotions and unwanted health conditions”, but no worries. Here is a magic pill prescribed by government’s magically funded healthcare.
    ~~ Weeds and bugs. No problem. I can just spray them and magically everything will be fine.
    ~~ Cavities? No problem. We will put something in your drinking water to fix that.

    The ability to confront.
    Sometimes, things take some effort to properly resolve.
    It can be tough work.
    When society is taught that most things come effortlessly, they have a difficult time confronting the hard truth of the situation.

    “White Woman Syndrome” – Sometimes I run into ladies who actually are an older version of Barbie, Daddy’s little girl, where everything is “Lala Land” & rosie-dosie & Aerie Faerie. The term goes for both sexes…a plastic person who has a hard time confronting evil or matters of substance.

    But I am not worried. I will fix all this with my magic wand.

    • Duck says:

      “…I feel like there is nothing wrong with trying to put forth less effort when performing a task. I mean…who wants to hand dig fence-post-holes when an auger could whip them out quickly…”
      Thats the normal built n urge to save energy and not waste it and die… but its like our urge to seek and consume sweet things as often as possible- possibly not always best in the modern world.
      Beating instinct is the hardest thing because you have to know better AND want to beat it AND then still have a strategy to bolster your will power to make you do the right thig and not go with what your mid brain is trying to get you to do because it thins its living in cave man times.

  18. s.jamieson says:

    So far as Micheal Hastings is concerned, I believe that the Richard Clarke statement about cyber hacking was a red herring, pure and simple, to throw inquiry about bombs off the trail. Why, other than a bomb, would the transmission of Hastings’ car be 100 yards behind the eventual location beside the tree where it burnt?

    • Octium says:

      It most likely was a bit of both. Hacking to make it look like reckless driving and an explosive device to make sure he was going to be finished off and cover up the evidence.

      • VoiceOfArabi says:

        Hello Octium,

        I think you are on to something very important…

        I mean… If i was an engineer (and I am not!)… All I have to do is wire an extra airbag next to the fuel tank and hook it up to the airbag system…

        It will guarantee an explosion on every impact, without any evidence of none automotive items on the scene…

        if you can lock the doors and accelerate remotely… you can suicide anyone you want… (failing that… Just ram them hard.)

  19. s.jamieson says:

    Computerization itself should be questioned much more than it is. It’s a given, an axiom, that computers will control everything as soon as possible, and while fears and doubts about where it’s all going are fine, there is no one saying Maybe Computers Are a Huge Mistake. Am I going to have to be that person? But all I have is gut feeling . . . my Investigative Reporter phase of life kicks in???

    • mkey says:

      Computers, like any other bit of technology are not either good nor bad. You may apply technology correctly and incorrectly, who’s really in control is the most important thing, computers as they are won’t be controlling anything for a while longer.

  20. Fawlty Towers says:

    As these autonomous cars slowly begin to make their way into the mainstream traffic around the world people will most likely start to tinker with the systems just as millions do worldwide with their existing vehicles.

    Instead of souping up the engines, replacing the tires, shocks, etc. people will focus more on the software.
    Software hacks to raise the maximum speed, increase the acceleration, shorten the stopping time etc. etc.

    • manbearpig says:

      Awesome link as usual Ukdavec:

      “…Data security: We see potential for consumers to question the security of the system. Given recent high-profile vehicle hackings,
      we believe that automakers and component manufacturers need to ensure that the messages being sent and received by drivers are
      secure. The accuracy and timeliness of the messages being sent need to be validated in order to prevent either fraudulent or dated
      messages from being sent and received by surrounding drivers.
      Spectrum sharing: As it stands today, DSRC is allocated a 75MHz bandwidth for all V2V and V2I communication. While this is
      currently sufficient, there are ongoing concerns about the idea of sharing bandwidth with the expanding Wi-Fi signals. In addition,
      with the 260mn vehicles on the road today in the US, there exists potential for the spectrum to become crowded and slow down the
      sending and receipt of messages – creating a concern. Outside of conventional DSRC, the 4G/LTE spectrum could also become
      crowded as the information being transmitted by large numbers of vehicles is added to the existing data usage from existing mobile
      devices.

      Privacy: In addition to data security, we see data privacy as an additional concern. We believe that consumers, particularly
      Millennials with additional exposure to the web and social media, see data privacy as a significant concern.

      For V2V/V2I specifically, these relate to vehicle tracking and information gathering.

      For example, with the use of roadside units, we would expect motorists who exceed the speed limit and drive past red lights and stop signs to be easily caught, without the use of cameras or police.

      Local/national governments: Lastly, we feel that local/national governments will play a role in the implementation of V2V/V2I
      technologies. While the NHTSA is already outlining legislation for V2V/V2I technology, we believe that government funding will also
      be a consideration in addition to rulemaking. We see several potential benefits from V2I technology affecting both safety and
      efficiency. In terms of safety, V2I could provide drivers with early warnings of upcoming bad weather, congestion, or road work. For efficiency, we see potential uses in regulating the flow of traffic not only by providing drivers with more accurate traffic light datbut also by providing driver usage data for traffic analysis. Assuming that roadside units will be used to achieve these V2I benefits, we expect that new units will need to be built both inside cities as well as on highways, incurring a cost for either local/state municipalities or the national government. While it is still a bit early to speculate on which regions will be first to implement roadside units, it is important to point out that some sort of government funding is likely needed to achieve full potential of the technology. Therefore, we see a risk in a delayed full implementation given the added complexities of government spending and the associated infrastructure upgrade…

      • manbearpig says:

        Well, as others have experienced, when I clicked on “submit” my comment disappeared from the screen with no possibility to edit or even any trace of the comment on the site when I checked back a while later (so as to avoid this sort of triple posting).

        Guess we’ll just have to grin and bear it.

        more proof of the capricious nature of algorithms… feel sorry for bin Salman…with a wife like that…

    • manbearpig says:

      Awesome links as usual:

      “…Data security: We see potential for consumers to question the security of the system. Given recent high-profile vehicle hackings,
      we believe that automakers and component manufacturers need to ensure that the messages being sent and received by drivers are
      secure. The accuracy and timeliness of the messages being sent need to be validated in order to prevent either fraudulent or dated
      messages from being sent and received by surrounding drivers.
      Spectrum sharing: As it stands today, DSRC is allocated a 75MHz bandwidth for all V2V and V2I communication. While this is
      currently sufficient, there are ongoing concerns about the idea of sharing bandwidth with the expanding Wi-Fi signals. In addition,
      with the 260mn vehicles on the road today in the US, there exists potential for the spectrum to become crowded and slow down the
      sending and receipt of messages – creating a concern. Outside of conventional DSRC, the 4G/LTE spectrum could also become
      crowded as the information being transmitted by large numbers of vehicles is added to the existing data usage from existing mobile
      devices.

      Privacy: In addition to data security, we see data privacy as an additional concern. We believe that consumers, particularly
      Millennials with additional exposure to the web and social media, see data privacy as a significant concern. For V2V/V2I

      specifically, these relate to vehicle tracking and information gathering.

      For example, with the use of roadside units, we would expect motorists who exceed the speed limit and drive past red lights and stop signs to be easily caught, without the use of cameras or police.

      Local/national governments: Lastly, we feel that local/national governments will play a role in the implementation of V2V/V2I
      technologies. While the NHTSA is already outlining legislation for V2V/V2I technology, we believe that government funding will also
      be a consideration in addition to rulemaking. We see several potential benefits from V2I technology affecting both safety and
      efficiency. In terms of safety, V2I could provide drivers with early warnings of upcoming bad weather, congestion, or road work. For efficiency, we see potential uses in regulating the flow of traffic not only by providing drivers with more accurate traffic light data but also by providing driver usage data for traffic analysis. Assuming that roadside units will be used to achieve these V2I benefits, we expect that new units will need to be built both inside cities as well as on highways, incurring a cost for either local/state municipalities or the national government. While it is still a bit early to speculate on which regions will be first to implement roadside units, it is important to point out that some sort of government funding is likely needed to achieve full potential of the technology. Therefore, we see a risk in a delayed full implementation given the added complexities of government spending and the associated infrastructure upgrades…”

    • manbearpig says:

      Fun stuff and 5G urgency!

      “…TE Connectivity – leader in automotive connectors TE Connectivity is a leading supplier of connectors and sensors for the automotive end market. We believe that TE is positioned to benefit from autonomous driving given its broad portfolio (including both connectors and sensors) and strong market share in connectors (over 35% based on data from Bishop & Associates)…

      …Data security: We see potential for consumers to question the security of the system. Given recent high-profile vehicle hackings, we believe that automakers and component manufacturers need to ensure that the messages being sent and received by drivers are secure. The accuracy and timeliness of the messages being sent need to be validated in order to prevent either fraudulent or dated messages from being sent and received by surrounding drivers.

      Spectrum sharing: As it stands today, DSRC is allocated a 75MHz bandwidth for all V2V and V2I communication. While this is currently sufficient, there are ongoing concerns about the idea of sharing bandwidth with the expanding Wi-Fi signals. In addition, with the 260mn vehicles on the road today in the US, there exists potential for the spectrum to become crowded and slow down the sending and receipt of messages – creating a concern. Outside of conventional DSRC, the 4G/LTE spectrum could also become crowded as the information being transmitted by large numbers of vehicles is added to the existing data usage from existing mobile devices.

      Privacy: In addition to data security, we see data privacy as an additional concern. We believe that consumers, particularly Millennials with additional exposure to the web and social media, see data privacy as a significant concern. For V2V/V2I specifically, these relate to vehicle tracking and information gathering. For example, with the use of roadside units, we would expect motorists who exceed the speed limit and drive past red lights and stop signs to be easily caught, without the use of cameras or police.

      …Assuming that roadside units will be used to achieve these V2I benefits, we expect that new units will need to be built both inside cities as well as on highways, incurring a cost for either local/state municipalities or the national government. While it is still a bit early to speculate on which regions will be first to implement roadside units, it is important to point out that some sort of government funding is likely needed to achieve full potential of the technology. Therefore, we see a risk in a delayed full implementation given the added complexities of government spending and the associated infrastructure upgrades…”

      Autonomous cars are an ominous theme for auto insurers, as the prospect of removing human involvement in driving activity could effectively torpedo the concept of auto liability coverage, a market which represents almost $200bn in domestic annual premiums. However, the path to AV has more significance to insurers, as the business could materially change before AV goes mainstream.

      • manbearpig says:

        Being gamed into acceptance:

        “…Consumer acceptance: A generational divide, but concerns can be addressed:

        …When we distill this down, we believe that consumers’ wariness of new autonomous driving technology, limited willingness to pay, and

        inclination towards infotainment features of a car, leaves the industry players in an interesting position.

        Even though our trajectory of autonomous vehicles suggests a launch around 2025, we believe that auto OEMs need to intensely focus on developing autonomous features that are automotive grade, in addition to driving the message about the advantages across to the consumers who are imperative to the success of the technology…

        Developing countries gratefully connected and out-Smarted:

        …As we continue to see large metropolitan cities bloom up in developing regions, existing infrastructure in many cases is struggling to cope with the large influx of people and automobiles. We think that that the adoption of autonomous vehicles will ultimately be a very important tool to manage some of these congestion issues making cities cleaner and more efficient and significantly improving the quality of life in the process…

        …In particular, we believe the Asia Pacific region would benefit the most compared to other regions given its high population and growing motorization. Given the lack of infrastructure and the congestion issues in developing regions, we reason that they should ultimately be receptive and supportive to autonomous vehicle adoption…

        …Autonomous vehicle adoption outside the US: We believe that legislation in Europe will follow the US closely –and most likely see a quicker penetration rate longer-term. We think this because several governments (UK, Netherlands, Sweden) have taken a fairly assertive stance in accommodating and supporting the development of autonomous vehicles. From an ADAS perspective there is the near-term support by Euro NCAP’s inclusion of advanced safety features into its star ratings. Furthermore, industry experts we spoke with noted that, while the Vienna Convention clearly states that a vehicle must have a driver who is able to control it at all times, the expectation is that this can be fairly easily amended –though it typically takes several years. In China, while the government has been relatively quiet on the topic so far, the widely expected inclusion of active safety features into C-NCAP in 2018
        bodes well for ADAS demand – and the introduction of full AVs will certainly be heavily directed by government policy. Lastly, in Japan, while the government has expressed a positive attitude toward autonomous driving, the targeted dates for implementation of different levels of autonomy appear conservative compared to the dates most experts see as in line with expected technological innovations, so there will most likely be a slower adoption rate within the region…”

    • HomeRemedySupply says:

      Thank you Ukdavec. Interesting.

  21. HomeRemedySupply says:

    Just for the record…

    I believe that Aubrey McClendon was the victim of a remote controlled automobile murder on March 2, 2016. It is my personal speculation.
    The Chesapeake Energy Corp. co-founder’s 2013 Chevy Tahoe crashed the morning after a federal grand jury indicted him on bid-rigging charges.
    (3 minute video)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL7309tce8s

    About the autopsy.
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-aubrey-mcclendon-death-investigation-20160608-story.html

    EXCERPT
    A report on the crash in March showed that McClendon, made no serious attempt to slow his SUV as it veered across the road and smashed into a concrete wall at 78 miles per hour, bursting into flames and killing him. The SUV crossed the road’s center line 189 feet before hitting the wall, maintaining a speed of 88 miles per hour even as he lightly tapped the brakes several times. It slowed upon impact, possibly because it hit softer ground after leaving the roadway, the police said.

    Following the indictment, there were probably others involved who wouldn’t want Aubrey to talk. And, of course, there is lots of money involved.
    For example: A second “alleged” co-conspirator, ex-partner Tom Ward.
    Listen to this video when Ward is confronted…
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/oil-prices-rise-not-us-203908039.html#

    ~~~
    It seems to me, hacking a car in order to commit a murder could be a relatively simple way to do it. The car goes into flames. Digital ‘fingerprints’ get fried. And if any digital forensics did suggest a murder, it would be difficult to find proof of the culprit. I can see this method preferred by many. There is a lot of big money, white collar crime. I am not advocating murder…I am just saying that big money psychos might utilize car hacking in order to achieve objectives.

    This video has a “coder” talking about open source and hacking cars.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft8_xyd1mdY
    He mentions this website which has the “Car Hacker’s Handbook” and other cool stuff
    http://opengarages.org/handbook/
    http://opengarages.org/index.php/Main_Page

    • VoiceOfArabi says:

      Hello HomeRemedySupply and all Corbetteers,

      This is business opportunity of course…

      Buy all the manual cars that you can afford and store them in dry country (maybe Arizona). Go for good looking cars prior to 1990.

      Soon.. you will sell them for really premium price.

      Also… restoring old cars will be very lucrative business

      1996 is when they implemented the ECU in cars.

  22. manbearpig says:

    Well since I’ve hit 24 karma points I consider that I have a right to a flagrant non-sequitur here in Corbett Land:

    https://libcom.org/library/obsolescence-man-volume-i-part-two-%E2%80%9C-world-phantom-matrix-philosophical-considerations-r

    I’ve just discovered the existence, thanks to a student, of Gũnther Anders!

    gotta run!

    • manbearpig says:

      Haven’t yet sat down and concentrated on Gunther Anders but from Wiki:

      “…Introduction. “Outdatedness of Human Beings 2”

      This volume is “…a philosophical anthropology in the age of technocracy”. With “technocracy” I do not mean the rule of technocrats (as if they were a group of specialists, who dominate today’s politics), but the fact, that the world, in which we live and which determines us, is a technological one – which extends so far, that we are not allowed to say, that in our historical situation there is among other things technology, rather do we have to say: within the world’s status called “technology” history happens, in other words technology has become the subject of history, in which we are only “co-historical”…

      …Love Yesterday. Notes on the History of Feelings. 1986.
      Without knights no chivalry, without court no courtliness, without salon no charm, without material support no deference will last indefinitely, not even as make-believe. In the same manner what shrinks in a world that cheats us out of leisure and other preconditions of our privacy, are the subtleties of our emotional private lives….”

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%BCnther_Anders

  23. danmanultra says:

    For people who refuse to use driverless vehicles, like I am inclined to do, I wonder what will happen to us… I really hate driving as is ,tbh. Traffic sucks. Can’t imagine how horrible it would be if no one’s brain is engaged at all!

    • Fawlty Towers says:

      Expect to see a lot of driverless vehicles cut-off and their computers uttering four-letter words followed by some vicious horn-honking!

      Ever been stuck behind a student driver?
      Multiply that by 1000+ ‘student drivers’ and see how your patience will quickly wear thin. 🙂

    • manbearpig says:

      That idea seemed to emerge as I skimmed your Goldman Sachs link yesterday.

      truthstreammedia.com/2017/08/19/system-forcing-total-saturated-5g-future-without-safety-checks/

      A future forseen in 1960 by Madeleine l’Engle (L’Engle wrote repeatedly about the writing of the story and the long struggle to get it published…When she completed the book in early 1960, however, it was rejected by at least 26 publishers)

      wrinkle-in-time.wikia.com/wiki/Camazotz

      a single entity pulsing in unison…

  24. manbearpig says:

    Fun Econtalk with Benedict Evans!

    with that notion of the “Car Chase Scene” as delightfully emblematic of the driverless car paradigm… meaning

    What could a car chase scene possibly look like in a total surveillance driverless car paradigm? What could possibly comparably replace it?

    What does “flee” even mean in such a society?

    future actors pretending to know how to drive

    and striving to understand what “flee” or “hide” even means…?

    Flashes of “Inception” fill my mind’s eyes…

    • mkey says:

      That’s an interesting thought. Maybe cars could be given cool AI which would make them an all in one device: a vehicle, a driver and a cool cat. Entertainment potential is limitless.

  25. manbearpig says:

    High Assurance Cyber-physical Systems

    even the remedial acronym spells “HACS”…

    In the above driverless car “show notes” video DARPA’s Kathleen Fisher speaks about songs that take control of your automobile, hackable insuline pumps and other remote attacks that can “cause physical damage while hiding evidence of the attack from local monitoring…control systems designed for safety but not security”… and says

    “These monitoring systems are themselves really complicated software systems, and can themselves introduce new vulnerabilities and privilage escalation opportunities… a third of the vulnerabilities in the October 2010 Vulnerability Watch list were themselves coming from “security products”…compromised routers have traded information…hence the need for High Assurance Cyber Systems…the lines in light blue correspond to various versions of the linux kernel…it would take 12000 person years to verify the current version of the Linux kernel…dozens and dozens of stable versions of the linux kernel produced in the last few years…” Thank goodness for quantum computing I guess to accelerate this code verification…?

    and Ptech sounds like “Petit Technology”…next to HACS…which frankly doesn’t sound anymore reassuring…

  26. meshugga42 says:

    Hello, James!

    i’m a little behind, but finally got around to watching your ep341. The accident in Arizona reminded me of an article that crossed my desk not too long ago:

    https://www.bicycleretailer.com/product-tech/2018/01/09/ford-trek-and-tome-show-bicycle-vehicle-communication-system-ces

    Under the guise of safety, then, even bicycles are being logged on to the internet of things.

    Just in case you want to know a little about Tome Software:

    https://www.tomesoftware.com/b2v/

    Only corporations are listed as board members. i haven’t had time to dig any further, but i suspect that a group of interlocking names might be a common factor when comparing each company.

  27. I Shot Santa says:

    I just got through watching this video. While the numbers were nice, there are some points that I found very interesting. While this press conference just killed the democratic party, that was really just a mercy killing. The DNC has been an embarrassment for a while now. It’s the other things which really interested me:

    1- Note the demeanor of the news announcers. They are not only NOT attacking Trump; they look visibly shaken to me.

    2- They start by expressing doubt, but then move into a more “fair and balanced” routine. None of it false, but done in a manner that even the dullest of minds can grasp it’s points. Even the economist during the speech did this.

    3- Not one mention of Russia.

    4- There is a build-up for an assault on the Federal Reserve. Remember, everyone touts this economic growth as sustainable; only interest rates and the trade wars could stop it. The trade wars won’t happen; the EU has already capitulated. China would be a fool to push for one as well. Xi wouldn’t survive one. Not his country; him. This leaves only the FED as the single factor which endangers the economy. This was not an accident.

    There are more, but these are the ones I found interesting. I don’t own a tv, so I don’t know where CBS stands on the media range, but I suspect it’s on the left. I do know they were the only American MSM outlet that gave any airtime to the trial in Italy of the CIA agents in that old “rendition” (AKA kidnapping) case some 15 years ago. I suspect there has been a shifting of powers over here. It is not complete, but it is almost done.

    Oops! Forgot to add the video link:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meMN4IaImwk

  28. I Shot Santa says:

    By the way, while I believe the Q psy-op is an intel op; I think that is a very good reason to follow it closely. While the host of this show is the king of assumptions; the actual postings pretty much say it all. Basically, this Q just announced a second American Revolution. GitMo opened and all that for the kakistocracy (or Deep State). While I love everything this Q is saying; that doesn’t mean that I believe it is as it says. Sorry, studying history means that I had to learn just how little one should trust government; which is none. While all of this may be happening just as they say; they are not mentioning why we need such an increased military budget, space force, RealID, etc. After all, we are supposed to be moving towards a more libertarian system. The Q parts (all the previous is interesting, but is mostly conjecture)start at around 9:50. Like I said, while I believe it is straight from the NSA’s lips; that’s the best reason to pay attention to it. The feeling I get while watching it reminded me of when they told us to move out on an ambush once, while I was with a unit that I knew was completely incompetent. But, that was some 25 years ago and I’m still here. JimBob who is also kind of relieved that the bubble may actually be pricked, no matter how they plan for it to go off.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFuJlqKIITw

  29. I Shot Santa says:

    I can’t remember if DEWs were brought up yet, but Hi Impact just uploaded a video on the Carr fires out west. I haven’t finished it yet, but the footage of the burnt houses all separated by untouched trees does look different from any fire I’ve ever seen. It also seems to me that during the last similar event; the media coverage really slowed down after a Fire Fighter claimed they were DEW attacks. Just another reason to live on the east coast. JimBob who notes that swamps will really smoke you out, but that’s better than burning.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE1HjE58CWw

  30. Fawlty Towers says:

    Driverless cars?
    How about pilotless planes?

    That was the topic of discussion on a recent CBC radio show.
    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/would-you-fly-in-a-pilotless-plane-ai-aircrafts-are-on-the-horizon-1.4768015

    A few comments stood out for me in the various interviews that were broadcast:

    John Fox (50 year veteran of aviation industry): “So we’ve come such a long way, but there is an inherent skepticism when you start talking about brand new technology, is it going to make it safer in fact, or not? And so there’s a big question there because we’ve had such great success. Eventually more and more automation will be incorporated, but in the near term, the near and medium term, I don’t think you’re going to see the wide acceptance of pilotless airplanes.”

    That’s right John, not the wide acceptance that you see with the U.S. military for example for the past couple of decades. 🙂

    Q: “Now I’ll ask you the same question I asked Barry Kirk, maybe I know your answer already, but if they came out with a commercial pilotless plane next year would you get in that flight?”

    Fox: “I don’t think that the technology has advanced to the point yet where I would be comfortable without a flight crew member on board, so I’d say in the near term my answer would be no.”

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