Author Archive

18
Apr

The common law of defamation turns the basic tenets of jurisprudence on its head, making defendants guilty until proven innocent. Denis Rancourt of UofOWatch.blogspot.ca joins us today to help paint the bigger picture of how defamation arose in the common law, and how it is wielded to clamp down on freedom of expression. We also discuss what the average person can do to help topple this faulty legal principle and the systemically corrupt court system that upholds it.

SHOW NOTES

University of Ottawa Watch website

OCLA website

OCLA position paper on Bill 83

Public Money is Not for Silencing Critics

Category : Interviews | Blog
17
Apr

by James Corbett
BoilingFrogsPost.com
April 16, 2014

In May 1998, 15 year old Kip Kinkel murdered his parents and two classmates, as well as injuring 25 others, after engaging in a shooting spree that ended up in his school’s cafeteria. In the investigation it emerged that he had been taking popular antidepressant medication Prozac since the summer of the previous year.

In December 2000, Michael McDermott went on a shooting rampage at his workplace, Edgewater Technologies, killing seven of his co-workers. During his trial, the court heard testimony that in the weeks before the shooting, McDermott had tripled the dosage of his antidepressant medication, Prozac, from 70 milligrams per day to 210 milligrams.

In March 2005, 16 year old Jeff Weise shot and killed nine people, including five students at Red Lake Senior High School in Minnesota, before turning the gun on himself. It was later revealed he had been undergoing treatment for depression and had been on Prozac at the time.

In September 2008, Finnish post-secondary student Matti Saari shot and killed ten other students on campus before killing himself. The official Finnish government report on the incident revealed that he had been taking an SSRI medication at the time of the shooting.

SSRI stands for Selective Seratonin Reuptake Inhibitor, and it is a class of drugs that is often used to treat depression and anxiety. It includes Prozac, Zoloft, Celexa, Paxil and a host of other commonly prescribed antidepressants. And the perpetrators of a raft of school shootings, mass murders and other violent incidents in recent years have been taking them.

And so it was perhaps not surprising when the culprit of this month’s mass shooting at Fort Hood, Specialist Ivan Lopez, turned out to be taking unnamed antidepressants himself.

Although it has yet to be reported (and may in fact never be revealed) precisely what type of antidepressant Lopez was taking or whether it was an SSRI, the number of confirmed SSRI shooters in recent years has raised the question of a causal link between the medication and incidents of violence.

Although the drug manufacturers are quick to downplay this connection as anecdotal or coincidental mounting scientific evidence points to a strong correlation between the use of psychiatric drugs in general, and SSRIS in particular, and violent behavior.

In 2010, the Public Library of Science published a study titled “Prescription Drugs Associa
ted with Reports of Violence Towards Others
” which examined how 484 drugs were associated with 1,937 documented cases of violent behaviour. Of those 484 drugs, 31 of them were responsible for 79% of the violence, including 11 antidepressants.

When incidents of school massacres in the US are charted against prescription of psychiatric medication, the correlation is undeniable. Further research is needed to establish if there is a causal linkage between these pharmaceuticals and the incidents of violence, but critics of the big pharmaceutical manufacturers complain such research is hampered by the low standards for reporting that these companies are held to.

One such critic, David Healy, author of over 150 peer-reviewed papers in the field of psychiatry and the author of numerous books, including Pharmageddon, joined me on The Corbett Report last week to discuss this issue.

Further complicating the issue is the fact that the general public is often, as in the case of the Fort Hood shooter, left in a state of limbo regarding the medical history of the perpetrators of these mass shooting events. Often stories are reported with vague and unconfirmed details about “antidepressants” or sometimes just medication. It can be difficult for the average person to sort through the daily reports of adverse and violent effects of these types of drugs.

One website that helps in that effort is SSRIStories.org. Begun in the 1990s, it is a repository of over 5000 news articles in which prescription drugs were linked to adverse events, including incidents of violence. Last week Julie Wood, one of the proprietors of the site, joined me to discuss the problem of sorting through the often incomplete information from these reports.

In the final equation, the question of the causal linkage between SSRIs and indeed other forms of psychiatric drugs and incidents of violence needs to be taken seriously. There are many factors at play here, from differences in individual reactions to the fact that people who are more likely to commit violent acts in the first place are often the people who are prescribed these drugs.

But the threat of violence has been taken seriously enough that the FDA in the US, the Ministry of Health in Japan and other similar bodies in countries around the world have added a warning in their guidelines for antidepressants. According to the Japanese Ministry of Health, “There are cases where we cannot rule out a causal relationship [of hostility, anxiety, and sudden acts of violence] with the medication.” And in the FDA formulation: “Antidepressant medicines may increase suicidal thoughts or actions in some children, teenagers, and young adults within the first few months of treatment.”

How can it be seen to be a good thing for anyone but the drug manufacturers themselves that these drugs have been on the market for decades and the bodies in charge of regulating them still can only offer such wishy-washy, non-evidence based statements? The issue of drug-linked violence is one that we as a society need to start discussing and acting on soon, otherwise we will continue to let the status quo be ruled not by doctors or patients or their loved ones, and certainly not by the victims of these mass murders, but by the men in the board rooms of these pharmaceutical companies who have been shown time and time again to care about nothing other than their own bottom line.

Category : Videos | Blog
14
Apr

Editor’s Note: This is an article from The Corbett Report Subscriber, the weekly e-newsletter for members of corbettreport.com. Please support this website and this work by signing up for a Corbett Report membership today for as little as 100 Japanese Yen ($1 US) per month. CLICK HERE for details.

by James Corbett
corbettreport.com
April 12, 2014

Reports out of Moscow indicate that Russia is on the verge of signing the “holy grail” of gas deals with China. The deal between Russian state-owned gas firm Gazprom and Beijing would see as much as 38 billion cubic meters of natural gas per year flowing through the first proposed Russia-China pipeline by 2018. The agreement has apparently been in the works for years, but recent events on Moscow’s western flank (read: the Ukrainian situation) has moved the timetable on the plan up dramatically, with the last sticking point being the price. If the deal is signed next month during Putin’s state visit to China, as many analysts are speculating will happen, it will be a significant event not only economically, but geopolitically.

Given the fact that Russia, the world’s largest gas producer, and China, the world’s largest gas consumer, are neighbors it would be logical to assume that a gas pipeline between the two countries already exists. But logic and geopolitics seldom mix, and tensions between the two formerly communist countries (however one characterizes China’s current political and economic system) have remained ever since border disputes brought Moscow and Beijing to the brink of war in the 1960s. Establishing a gas link would thus be a very powerful signal of the growing understanding between the Russian bear and the Chinese dragon that their future lies more with each other than it does with a NATO-backed alliance that is increasingly encircling and isolating them.

Speaking of logic, this latest deal, if it is signed after all, would only be the logical extension of all of the moves toward cooperation between Russia, China and their ex-Soviet satellites that we’ve been seeing in recent years.

There’s the rise of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. The “SCO” encompasses China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, with Afghanistan, India, Iran, Mongolia and Pakistan waiting in the wings as observer nations, and Belarus, Sri Lanka and Turkey as “dialogue partners.” Originally the “Shanghai Five” of signatories to the 1996 Treaty on Deepening Military Trust in Border Regions, the group has gone on to deepen their military, intelligence and security ties, staging joint military exercises since 2003 and China-Russia war games since 2005. They are also coordinating on security matters, including a 2004 agreement on a Regional Antiterrorism Structure and the 2006 cooperation agreement with CSTO, the NATO counterbalance in the region.

There’s the rise of the BRICS. From a theoretical construct in an economic paper in 2001 to a very real political association with annual summits and ministers meetings today, the rise of the BRICS grouping in the past decade has been undeniable. Although the days of double digit growth and “taking over the world” reports are now a thing of the past, the association remains important for its ability to fuse developing economies as diverse as those of Brazil, Russia, China, India and South Africa into an economic and political counterbalance to the so-called “Washington consensus” of the World Bank / IMF regime. While China is undeniably in the BRICS driver’s seat, the access that the five-nation grouping gives each other’s member nations to far-flung parts of the globe, and the ways that the members’ economies can find surprisingly symbiotic notes (like that of the relation between Brazil and China) have made it into more than the sum of its parts, and it is now looking to expand its regional influence with the creation of the BRICS development bank.

There’s the rise of the Eurasian Union. Set to come into existence on New Year’s Day 2015, the proposed economic union of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia has been modeled on the European Union, complete with a “Eurasian Economic Commission” based on the European Commission. The Commission will coordinate integration on customs issues, macroeconomics, energy and financial policy, labour migration and other key issues, with the end goal being a European Union-style supra-national organization very much like the EU. Armenia, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are already waiting in the wings to get on board with the union, with Kyrgyzstan shutting down the U.S. Manas air base (allegedly used to ship drugs out of Afghanistan) and expanding the Russian air base that it currently hosts as a goodwill gesture.

Once again, the idea that Russia would seek closer economic, political and military cooperation with its regional neighbours is a perfectly logical and predictable outcome of the pressure that is building on Russia’s western flank from the US and NATO, not just the recent sanctions, but the years-long build-up of “ballistic missile defense” in Eastern Europe and NATO’s steady progress in swallowing up Eastern European nations. For those who are still locked in the mindset that moves on the geopolitical chessboard are essentially random, with countries scattering this way and that like billiard balls at the break, this poses a puzzling question: why would the NATO allies be backing Russia into a corner to the point that it starts engaging in these alliances? After all, the more Russia turns to its regional allies the more it weans itself and its economy off of the very system that could provide diplomatic and political pressure points for NATO to press upon when needed. In other words, why is NATO helping to push their geopolitical rivals into a closer union? Are they trying to build up their own enemy?

For those who like their answers up front, that answer is “yes.”

For those who need to see the argument before they arrive at the conclusion, there are no shortage of stories demonstrating how Russia, China, and their “resistance bloc” allies have been built up by the west in recent years.

The sanctions that have been levied against Iran in recent years have steadily driven that country into bilateral trade agreements that not only circumvent the sanctions, but help ease the country and its trading partners off their dependency on the dollar. There was the ‘gas-for-gold‘ swap between Iran and Turkey that skirted the sanctions. There was the ‘junk-for-oil‘ trade between Iran and India/China. There was the rouble-denominated bilateral agreement signed between Russia and Iran in 2012. In the long run, the west succeeded in doing damage to the Iranian economy, but they also succeeded in building up trading alliances that skirt the dollar (and weaken future sanctions regimes) altogether.

The growing naval and aerial threat of the Chinese military has US technology to thank, not only by direct military transfer (as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory whistleblower demonstrated the Clinton administration did in the 1990s) but by indirect (and illegal) transfers via Israel. And just last month, a congressional investigation uncovered evidence that the US government was planning to give Russia high level military technology for use in training their troops as part of the FY2015 budget, even as they were talking about tough sanctions and dire consequences for Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

The Chinese industrial juggernaut did not just spring up overnight; the infrastructure for China’s economic marvel of the last decade was laid in the decade before. In the seven years from 1994 to 2001 alone, direct investment of US-based multinational corporations in China quadraupled from $2.6 billion to $10.5 billion.

Source Data: Excel file

In the same time period, China rose from the 30th-largest target of US R&D investment to the 11th on the back of a doubling of US affiliates in the country. The list of companies that started major R&D activities or facilities in China in the 1990s reads like a who’s who of the CFR-nested Fortune 500 set: DuPont, Ford, General Electric, General Motors, IBM, Intel, Lucent Technologies, Microsoft, Motorola, and Rohm and Haas all had a significant stake in China by the beginning of the 21st century.

And the BRICS association that economists were wringing their hands over in previous years as a major threat to American-led western economic neoliberalism? It was actually created by Goldman Sachs, an outgrowth of a research paper that was convincing enough that it actually caused the four nations (of the then-”BRIC” grouping) to start a political process that made the paper into reality.

It seems that as we enter the world of the “new cold war” there is western backing behind every aspect of this new rivalry. And sure enough, the much-ballyhooed Cold War 2.0 is becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy. China’s decision to abstain from the UN Security Council vote on Crimea’s annexation last month was a significant turning point in and of itself. Given China’s unease over its own territorial issues (Tibet, Xinjiang), the fact that they didn’t vote for the resolution condemning a nation’s right to unilaterally secede from a country speaks volumes about China and Russia’s increasing cooperation in geopolitical matters.

The inescapable conclusion is that the NATO powers have helped to create their own enemy. They have helped to arm and fund that enemy, and then poked and prodded him into reaction. We would do well to remember the true genesis of this conflict the next time we are told about the “New Cold War.”

Category : Articles | Blog
12
Apr

The BFP Roundtable convenes once again, as Peter B. Collins, Guillermo Jimenez, James Corbett, and Sibel Edmonds unite to discuss the Russia-NATO conflict over Ukraine, the false choice of the “new cold war,” the Turkish connection to last year’s Syrian false flag, and the fact that Seymour Hersh needs to retire. For more information on these and other topics, please stay tuned to BoilingFrogsPost.com.

CLICK HERE for the mp3 audio of this conversation.

Category : Videos | Blog
12
Apr

Welcome to http://NewWorldNextWeek.com — the video series from Corbett Report and Media Monarchy that covers some of the most important developments in open source intelligence news. This week:

Story #1: Metgasco’s Gas Exploration Well Delayed After Protesters Block Entrance to Bentley Site
http://ur1.ca/h1yi7
Video: Will You Show Up? I Showed up! #BentleyBlockade
http://ur1.ca/h1yis
Introducing “The Spark”
http://ur1.ca/h1yiw
There’s Now a Flying Wind Turbine That Doubles As Wi-Fi
http://ur1.ca/h1yiy
Japan, U.S. Fail to Move Closer Over TPP Before Obama Visit
http://ur1.ca/h1yj5
Toyota Becoming More Efficient By Replacing Robots With Humans
http://ur1.ca/h1yj9
Climate Scientist Ridicules U.N. Report as Junk
http://ur1.ca/h1yja
Soda Sales Rapidly Decline Across the U.S.; Down 20% Since 1998
http://ur1.ca/h1yjd
Do you always agree with the topics newspaper editors choose to cover?
http://ur1.ca/h1yjk

Story #2: US Navy ‘game-changer’: converting seawater into fuel
http://ur1.ca/h1yjo
BlackLight Power Announces Sustained Production of Electricity Using Photovoltaic Conversion
http://ur1.ca/h1yjt
US Navy to Test Futuristic Super-Fast Gun at Sea in 2016
http://ur1.ca/h1yjx

Story #3: Four Blood Moons: Does Alignment of Mars, Earth and Sun Mean the End of the World is Nigh?
http://ur1.ca/h1yk1
Dateline Israel : Signs in the Heavens of a Four Blood Moon Tetrad in 2014 and 2015
http://ur1.ca/h1yk6
Joel 2:31 (King James Version)
http://ur1.ca/h1yk9
Reagan’s astrologer
http://ur1.ca/h1ykf
It’s not an alien invasion, it’s Operation Blue Beam
http://ur1.ca/h1yki

Other #NewWorldNextWeek news:
Italy’s Bishops Pass Vatican-Backed Rule That Child Molestation Does Not Have to Be Reported
http://ur1.ca/h1ykl
Triathlete Injured By “Hacked” Camera Drone
http://ur1.ca/h1ykp
Eric Harroun, American Jihadist Who Fought in Syria, Dies Suddenly
http://ur1.ca/h1ykt
Media Monarchy: Interview w/ Jefferey Jaxen on ‘Divergent’
http://ur1.ca/h1yl0

Visit http://NewWorldNextWeek.com to get previous episodes in various formats to download, burn and share. And as always, stay up-to-date by subscribing to the #NewWorldNextWeek RSS feed or iTunes feed. Thank you.

Previous Episode: Good News Next Week
http://www.corbettreport.com/?p=8978

Category : Videos | Blog
12
Apr

In this edition of the BFP Roundtable, Peter B. Collins, Guillermo Jimenez, James Corbett and Sibel Edmonds discuss the latest moves in the formation of a so-called “new cold war” between NATO and Russia. We also tackle Seymour Hersh and his recent article in the London Review of Books examining Turkish involvement in the Syrian chemical weapons attack in Ghouta last year.

Category : Interviews | Blog
11
Apr

Julie Wood joins us to talk about the vast archive of media accounts of prescription drug-related violence at SSRIStories.org. We discuss the risks such drugs pose to a certain percentage of the population, including some of the specific examples of drug-induced suicide and violence caused by these pharmaceuticals, and how people can use a resource like RxISK.org to find more information on these topics.

Category : Interviews | Blog
11
Apr

Welcome to http://NewWorldNextWeek.com — the video series from Corbett Report and Media Monarchy that covers some of the most important developments in open source intelligence news. This week:

Story #1: Metgasco’s Gas Exploration Well Delayed After Protesters Block Entrance to Bentley Site
http://ur1.ca/h1yi7
Video: Will You Show Up? I Showed up! #BentleyBlockade
http://ur1.ca/h1yis
Introducing “The Spark”
http://ur1.ca/h1yiw
There’s Now a Flying Wind Turbine That Doubles As Wi-Fi
http://ur1.ca/h1yiy
Japan, U.S. Fail to Move Closer Over TPP Before Obama Visit
http://ur1.ca/h1yj5
Toyota Becoming More Efficient By Replacing Robots With Humans
http://ur1.ca/h1yj9
Climate Scientist Ridicules U.N. Report as Junk
http://ur1.ca/h1yja
Soda Sales Rapidly Decline Across the U.S.; Down 20% Since 1998
http://ur1.ca/h1yjd
Do you always agree with the topics newspaper editors choose to cover?
http://ur1.ca/h1yjk

Story #2: US Navy ‘game-changer’: converting seawater into fuel
http://ur1.ca/h1yjo
BlackLight Power Announces Sustained Production of Electricity Using Photovoltaic Conversion
http://ur1.ca/h1yjt
US Navy to Test Futuristic Super-Fast Gun at Sea in 2016
http://ur1.ca/h1yjx

Story #3: Four Blood Moons: Does Alignment of Mars, Earth and Sun Mean the End of the World is Nigh?
http://ur1.ca/h1yk1
Dateline Israel : Signs in the Heavens of a Four Blood Moon Tetrad in 2014 and 2015
http://ur1.ca/h1yk6
Joel 2:31 (King James Version)
http://ur1.ca/h1yk9
Reagan’s astrologer
http://ur1.ca/h1ykf
It’s not an alien invasion, it’s Operation Blue Beam
http://ur1.ca/h1yki

Other #NewWorldNextWeek news:
Italy’s Bishops Pass Vatican-Backed Rule That Child Molestation Does Not Have to Be Reported
http://ur1.ca/h1ykl
Triathlete Injured By “Hacked” Camera Drone
http://ur1.ca/h1ykp
Eric Harroun, American Jihadist Who Fought in Syria, Dies Suddenly
http://ur1.ca/h1ykt
Media Monarchy: Interview w/ Jefferey Jaxen on ‘Divergent’
http://ur1.ca/h1yl0

Visit http://NewWorldNextWeek.com to get previous episodes in various formats to download, burn and share. And as always, stay up-to-date by subscribing to the #NewWorldNextWeek RSS feed or iTunes feed. Thank you.

Previous Episode: Good News Next Week
http://www.corbettreport.com/?p=8978

Category : Interviews | Blog
11
Apr

Today we talk to Dr. David Healy, a professor of psychiatry and author of over 150 peer-reviewed research papers and 20 books, including his latest, Pharmageddon. We discuss the issue of antidepressants and behaviour modification, including the link between SSRIs and mass shootings.

SHOW NOTES:
DavidHealy.org

RxISK.org

SSRI Stories

Prozac and SSRIs: Twenty-fifth Anniversary

Are prescription drugs to blame for school shootings?

Category : Interviews | Blog